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Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation
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  • Cited by 319
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  • Edited by Christopher B. Field, Co-Chair IPCC Working Group II, Carnegie Institution for Science , Vicente Barros, Co-Chair IPCC Working Group II, Universidad de Buenos Aires , Thomas F. Stocker, Co-Chair IPCC Working Group I, University of Bern , Qin Dahe, Co-Chair IPCC Working Group I, China Meteorological Administration

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    Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation
    • Online ISBN: 9781139177245
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139177245
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Book description

This Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report (IPCC-SREX) explores the challenge of understanding and managing the risks of climate extremes to advance climate change adaptation. Extreme weather and climate events, interacting with exposed and vulnerable human and natural systems, can lead to disasters. Changes in the frequency and severity of the physical events affect disaster risk, but so do the spatially diverse and temporally dynamic patterns of exposure and vulnerability. Some types of extreme weather and climate events have increased in frequency or magnitude, but populations and assets at risk have also increased, with consequences for disaster risk. Opportunities for managing risks of weather- and climate-related disasters exist or can be developed at any scale, local to international. Prepared following strict IPCC procedures, SREX is an invaluable assessment for anyone interested in climate extremes, environmental disasters and adaptation to climate change, including policymakers, the private sector and academic researchers.

Reviews

'Extreme events and their evolution in a changing climate have received extensive treatment in previous reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), but this report goes further by considering management of the risk associated with such events … Because of its integration of disciplinary perspectives, this work is likely to remain relevant for several years and provide the foundation for future synthesis reports … Highly recommended. All academic, professional, and general library collections.'

J. Schoof Source: Choice

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