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Perspectives on Global Change
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  • Cited by 54
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Offermans, Astrid and Valkering, Pieter 2016. Socially Robust River Management: Role of Perspective Dependent Acceptability Thresholds. Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol. 142, Issue. 2, p. 04015062.

    Blanc, Elodie Strzepek, Kenneth Schlosser, Adam Jacoby, Henry Gueneau, Arthur Fant, Charles Rausch, Sebastian and Reilly, John 2014. Modeling U.S. water resources under climate change. Earth's Future, Vol. 2, Issue. 4, p. 197.

    Cornescu, Viorel and Adam, Roxana 2014. Considerations Regarding the Role of Indicators Used in the Analysis and Assessment of Sustainable Development in the E.U. Procedia Economics and Finance, Vol. 8, Issue. , p. 10.

    2014. Engineering for Sustainable Human Development. p. 217.

    Engelen, Guy 2013. Environmental Modelling. p. 349.

    Stroobants, Jesse and Bouckaert, Geert 2013. Towards Measurable and Auditable Efficiency Gains in the Flemish Public Sector. Public Organization Review, Vol. 13, Issue. 3, p. 245.

    Offermans, Astrid Valkering, Pieter Vreugdenhil, Heleen Wijermans, Nanda and Haasnoot, Marjolijn 2013. The Dutch dominant perspective on water; risks and opportunities involved. Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A, Vol. 48, Issue. 10, p. 1164.

    Haasnoot, Marjolijn Middelkoop, Hans Offermans, Astrid Beek, Eelco van and Deursen, Willem P. A. van 2012. Exploring pathways for sustainable water management in river deltas in a changing environment. Climatic Change, Vol. 115, Issue. 3-4, p. 795.

    Deffuant, G. Alvarez, I. Barreteau, O. de Vries, B. Edmonds, B. Gilbert, N. Gotts, N. Jabot, F. Janssen, S. Hilden, M. Kolditz, O. Murray-Rust, D. Rougé, C. and Smits, P. 2012. Data and models for exploring sustainability of human well-being in global environmental change. The European Physical Journal Special Topics, Vol. 214, Issue. 1, p. 519.

    2012. Ganga-Brahmaputra-Meghna Waters. p. 387.

    2012. Simulating Nature. p. 179.

    Haasnoot, M. Middelkoop, H. van Beek, E. and van Deursen, W. P. A. 2011. A method to develop sustainable water management strategies for an uncertain future. Sustainable Development, Vol. 19, Issue. 6, p. 369.

    Petersen, Arthur C. Cath, Albert Hage, Maria Kunseler, Eva and van der Sluijs, Jeroen P. 2011. Post-Normal Science in Practice at the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency. Science, Technology, & Human Values, Vol. 36, Issue. 3, p. 362.

    Offermans, Astrid Haasnoot, Marjolijn and Valkering, Pieter 2011. A method to explore social response for sustainable water management strategies under changing conditions. Sustainable Development, Vol. 19, Issue. 5, p. 312.

    van Ruijven, Bas van der Sluijs, Jeroen P. van Vuuren, Detlef P. Janssen, Peter Heuberger, Peter S. C. and de Vries, Bert 2010. Uncertainty from Model Calibration: Applying a New Method to Transport Energy Demand Modelling. Environmental Modeling & Assessment, Vol. 15, Issue. 3, p. 175.

    Hasna, Abdallah M 2010. Embedding sustainability in capstone engineering design projects. p. 1601.

    Nordhoff, Stefan Tacke, Thomas Brehmer, Benjamin Schiemann, Yvonne Böhland, Thomas and Lecou, Christos 2010. Managing CO2 Emissions in the Chemical Industry. p. 419.

    Ojekunle, Z. O. Lin, Z. Xin, T. Harrer, G. Martins, A. O. and Bangura, H. 2009. Global Climate Change: The Empirical Study of Sensitivity Model in China's Sustainable Development. Energy Sources, Part A: Recovery, Utilization, and Environmental Effects, Vol. 31, Issue. 19, p. 1777.

    Voß, Jan-Peter Smith, Adrian and Grin, John 2009. Designing long-term policy: rethinking transition management. Policy Sciences, Vol. 42, Issue. 4, p. 275.

    Wang, Q. J. Robertson, D. E. and Haines, C. L. 2009. A Bayesian network approach to knowledge integration and representation of farm irrigation: 1. Model development. Water Resources Research, Vol. 45, Issue. 2,

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  • Edited by Jan Rotmans, National Institute of Public Health and Environment (RIVM), The Netherlands , Bert de Vries, National Institute of Public Health and Environment (RIVM), The Netherlands

Book description

Human activity is undeniably affecting the rates of change of many parts of the global system. How this global change develops into the future is vitally important, but modelling these changes requires a complex, integrated assessment of a wide range of disciplines in science and social science. This book describes the structure, assumptions, philosophy and results of an advanced global integrated assessment model: TARGETS. For a number of future directions selected on the basis of divergent cultural perspectives, the model charts global implications in terms of population and health, energy, land- and water-use and biogeochemical cycles. This integrated assessment approach has led to innovative fresh insights into global change. The book will help policymakers formulate the strategies required for a sustainable global future. It will be of interest to a broad audience, from researchers and modellers of global change in science and social science, to policy analysts, decision makers and economists, and students of all aspects of global change.

Reviews

‘The book will be of interest to a wide audience ranging from policy makers to students of all aspect of global change.’

I. Colbeck Source: Water, Air and Soil Pollution

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