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Phylogeny and Conservation
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  • Cited by 37
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    2006. List of books for review. Environmental and Ecological Statistics, Vol. 13, Issue. 4, p. 465.

    Johnson, J. A. Thorstrom, R. and Mindell, D. P. 2007. Systematics and conservation of the hook-billed kite including the island taxa from Cuba and Grenada. Animal Conservation, Vol. 10, Issue. 3, p. 349.

    Jablonski, David 2008. Species Selection: Theory and Data. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, Vol. 39, Issue. 1, p. 501.

    Galloway, David J. 2008. Austral lichenology: 1690–2008. New Zealand Journal of Botany, Vol. 46, Issue. 4, p. 433.

    de Carvalho, Marcelo R. Bockmann, Flávio A. Amorim, Dalton S. and Brandão, Carlos Roberto F. 2008. Systematics must Embrace Comparative Biology and Evolution, not Speed and Automation. Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 35, Issue. 2, p. 150.

    Johnson, Jeff A. 2008. Recent Range Expansion and Divergence among North American Prairie Grouse. Journal of Heredity, Vol. 99, Issue. 2, p. 165.

    Arshad, Muhammad Gonzalez, Javier El-Sayed, Abdel Aziz Osborne, Tim and Wink, Michael 2009. Phylogeny and phylogeography of critically endangered Gyps species based on nuclear and mitochondrial markers. Journal of Ornithology, Vol. 150, Issue. 2, p. 419.

    ROSAUER, DAN LAFFAN, SHAWN W. CRISP, MICHAEL D. DONNELLAN, STEPHEN C. and COOK, LYN G. 2009. Phylogenetic endemism: a new approach for identifying geographical concentrations of evolutionary history. Molecular Ecology, Vol. 18, Issue. 19, p. 4061.

    Minh, B.Q. Pardi, F. Klaere, S. and von Haeseler, A. 2009. Budgeted Phylogenetic Diversity on Circular Split Systems. IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Vol. 6, Issue. 1, p. 22.

    Bielby, J. Cardillo, M. Cooper, N. and Purvis, A. 2010. Modelling extinction risk in multispecies data sets: phylogenetically independent contrasts versus decision trees. Biodiversity and Conservation, Vol. 19, Issue. 1, p. 113.

    Lamoreux, John F. and Lacher, Thomas E. 2010. Mammalian endemism, range size and conservation status in the southern temperate zone. Diversity and Distributions, Vol. 16, Issue. 6, p. 922.

    Avise, John C. 2010. Perspective: conservation genetics enters the genomics era. Conservation Genetics, Vol. 11, Issue. 2, p. 665.

    Cadotte, Marc W. and Jonathan Davies, T. 2010. Rarest of the rare: advances in combining evolutionary distinctiveness and scarcity to inform conservation at biogeographical scales. Diversity and Distributions, Vol. 16, Issue. 3, p. 376.

    Morlon, Hélène Schwilk, Dylan W. Bryant, Jessica A. Marquet, Pablo A. Rebelo, Anthony G. Tauss, Catherine Bohannan, Brendan J. M. and Green, Jessica L. 2011. Spatial patterns of phylogenetic diversity. Ecology Letters, Vol. 14, Issue. 2, p. 141.

    AVISE, JOHN C. and LIU, JIN-XIAN 2011. On the temporal inconsistencies of Linnean taxonomic ranks. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, Vol. 102, Issue. 4, p. 707.

    Mouquet, Nicolas Devictor, Vincent Meynard, Christine N. Munoz, Francois Bersier, Louis-Félix Chave, Jérôme Couteron, Pierre Dalecky, Ambroise Fontaine, Colin Gravel, Dominique Hardy, Olivier J. Jabot, Franck Lavergne, Sébastien Leibold, Mathew Mouillot, David Münkemüller, Tamara Pavoine, Sandrine Prinzing, Andreas Rodrigues, Ana S.L. Rohr, Rudolf P. Thébault, Elisa and Thuiller, Wilfried 2012. Ecophylogenetics: advances and perspectives. Biological Reviews, Vol. 87, Issue. 4, p. 769.

    Bland, Lucie M. Collen, Ben Orme, C. David L. and Bielby, Jon 2012. Data uncertainty and the selectivity of extinction risk in freshwater invertebrates. Diversity and Distributions, Vol. 18, Issue. 12, p. 1211.

    Verones, Francesca Saner, Dominik Pfister, Stephan Baisero, Daniele Rondinini, Carlo and Hellweg, Stefanie 2013. Effects of Consumptive Water Use on Biodiversity in Wetlands of International Importance. Environmental Science & Technology, Vol. 47, Issue. 21, p. 12248.

    Baeza, J. Antonio and Fuentes, M. Soledad 2013. Exploring phylogenetic informativeness and nuclear copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in three commonly used mitochondrial genes: mitochondrial phylogeny of peppermint, cleaner, and semi-terrestrial shrimps (Caridea:Lysmata,Exhippolysmata, andMerguia). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, Vol. 168, Issue. 4, p. 699.

    Razafindratsima, Onja H. Mehtani, Siya and Dunham, Amy E. 2013. Extinctions, traits and phylogenetic community structure: insights from primate assemblages in Madagascar. Ecography, Vol. 36, Issue. 1, p. 47.

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    Phylogeny and Conservation
    • Online ISBN: 9780511614927
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511614927
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Book description

Phylogeny is a potentially powerful tool for conserving biodiversity. This book explores how it can be used to tackle questions of great practical importance and urgency for conservation. Using case studies from many different taxa and regions of the world, the volume evaluates how useful phylogeny is in understanding the processes that have generated today's diversity and the processes that now threaten it. The novelty of many of the applications, the increasing ease with which phylogenies can be generated, the urgency with which conservation decisions have to be made and the need to make decisions that are as good as possible together make this volume a timely and important synthesis which will be of great value to researchers, practitioners and policy-makers alike.

Reviews

'Conservation books rarely display such optimism.'

Source: Biologist

'… a judicious volume that combines the original work and reviews of a wide range of experts into four main sections, within and across which chapters are well edited to interconnect, with cohesively styled and clear graphics. …This book is an excellent example of how diligent editors can pull together a controversial part of a field, particularly if backed by institutions with sufficient clout and resources to attract top participants. With its timely contributions, this volume will be valuable as supplementary reading for any course in conservation genetics, and will be particularly useful to advanced graduate students.'

Source: Oryx

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Contents

  • 1 - Phylogeny and conservation
    pp 1-16
    • By Andy Purvis, Reader in Biodiversity, Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berks SL5 7PY, UK, John L. Gittleman, Professor of Biology, Department of Biology, Gilmer Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA, Thomas Brooks, Head of the Conservation Synthesis Department, Conservation Synthesis Department, Center for Applied Biodiversity Science, Conservation International, 1919 M St, NW Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, USA
  • Part 1 - Units and currencies
    pp 17-18
    • By Andy Purvis, Reader in Biodiversity, Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berks SL5 7PY, UK, John L. Gittleman, Professor of Biology, Department of Biology, Gilmer Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA, Thomas Brooks, Head of the Conservation Synthesis Department, Conservation Synthesis Department, Center for Applied Biodiversity Science, Conservation International, 1919 M St, NW Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, USA
  • Part 3 - Effects of human processes
    pp 265-266
    • By Andy Purvis, Reader in Biodiversity, Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berks SL5 7PY, UK, John L. Gittleman, Professor of Biology, Department of Biology, Gilmer Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA, Thomas Brooks, Head of the Conservation Synthesis Department, Conservation Synthesis Department, Center for Applied Biodiversity Science, Conservation International, 1919 M St, NW Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, USA
  • Part 4 - Prognosis
    pp 385-386
    • By Andy Purvis, Reader in Biodiversity, Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berks SL5 7PY, UK, John L. Gittleman, Professor of Biology, Department of Biology, Gilmer Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA, Thomas Brooks, Head of the Conservation Synthesis Department, Conservation Synthesis Department, Center for Applied Biodiversity Science, Conservation International, 1919 M St, NW Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, USA

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