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Purely Functional Data Structures
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  • Cited by 49
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Nipkow, Tobias and Brinkop, Hauke 2018. Amortized Complexity Verified. Journal of Automated Reasoning,

    Foner, Kenneth Zhang, Hengchu and Lampropoulos, Leonidas 2018. Keep your laziness in check. Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, Vol. 2, Issue. ICFP, p. 1.

    Thiry, Laurent Zhao, Heng and Hassenforder, Michel 2018. Categories for (Big) Data models and optimization. Journal of Big Data, Vol. 5, Issue. 1,

    Madhavan, Ravichandhran Kulal, Sumith and Kuncak, Viktor 2017. Contract-based resource verification for higher-order functions with memoization. p. 330.

    Nipkow, Tobias 2017. Programming Languages and Systems. Vol. 10695, Issue. , p. 255.

    Jost, Steffen Vasconcelos, Pedro Florido, Mário and Hammond, Kevin 2017. Type-Based Cost Analysis for Lazy Functional Languages. Journal of Automated Reasoning, Vol. 59, Issue. 1, p. 87.

    Ge, Jike Chen, Zuqin Liu, Can Peng, Jun He, Wenbo and Zhu, Nan 2017. A RST-based stateful data analytics within spark. p. 394.

    Varga, Michal Kvassay, Miroslav and Kvet, Marek 2017. Graphical environment for enhancement of learning data structures. p. 1.

    Lampropoulos, Leonidas Spector-Zabusky, Antal and Foner, Kenneth 2017. Ode on a random urn (functional pearl). ACM SIGPLAN Notices, Vol. 52, Issue. 10, p. 26.

    Goldberg, Yoav 2017. Neural Network Methods for Natural Language Processing. Synthesis Lectures on Human Language Technologies, Vol. 10, Issue. 1, p. 1.

    Mogensen, Torben Ægidius 2017. Introduction to Compiler Design. p. 97.

    Zhang, Xiong and Guo, Philip J. 2017. DS.js. p. 691.

    Lampropoulos, Leonidas Spector-Zabusky, Antal and Foner, Kenneth 2017. Ode on a random urn (functional pearl). p. 26.

    Madhavan, Ravichandhran Kulal, Sumith and Kuncak, Viktor 2017. Contract-based resource verification for higher-order functions with memoization. ACM SIGPLAN Notices, Vol. 52, Issue. 1, p. 330.

    Gibbons, Jeremy 2017. Programming Languages and Systems. Vol. 10201, Issue. , p. 556.

    2016. Programming Language Explorations. p. 329.

    Nipkow, Tobias 2016. Interactive Theorem Proving. Vol. 9807, Issue. , p. 307.

    Stucki, Nicolas Rompf, Tiark Ureche, Vlad and Bagwell, Phil 2015. RRB vector: a practical general purpose immutable sequence. ACM SIGPLAN Notices, Vol. 50, Issue. 9, p. 342.

    Stucki, Nicolas Rompf, Tiark Ureche, Vlad and Bagwell, Phil 2015. RRB vector: a practical general purpose immutable sequence. p. 342.

    Prokopec, Aleksandar 2015. SnapQueue: lock-free queue with constant time snapshots. p. 1.

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Book description

Most books on data structures assume an imperative language like C or C++. However, data structures for these languages do not always translate well to functional languages such as Standard ML, Haskell, or Scheme. This book describes data structures from the point of view of functional languages, with examples, and presents design techniques so that programmers can develop their own functional data structures. It includes both classical data structures, such as red-black trees and binomial queues, and a host of new data structures developed exclusively for functional languages. All source code is given in Standard ML and Haskell, and most of the programs can easily be adapted to other functional languages. This handy reference for professional programmers working with functional languages can also be used as a tutorial or for self-study.

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