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  • Cited by 7
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Sullivan, Erin 2018. Shakespeare, Social Media, and the Digital Public Sphere: Such Tweet Sorrow and A Midsummer Night's Dreaming. Shakespeare, Vol. 14, Issue. 1, p. 64.

    Hadley, Bree 2017. Theatre, Social Media, and Meaning Making. p. 1.

    Hadley, Bree 2017. Theatre, Social Media, and Meaning Making. p. 53.

    Lanier, Douglas M. 2017. Shakespeare / Not Shakespeare. p. 293.

    Dean, David 2017. Negotiating accuracy and authenticity in an Aboriginal King Lear. Rethinking History, Vol. 21, Issue. 2, p. 255.

    Muñoz-Valdivieso, Sofía 2017. ‘All the World’s a Stage’: William Shakespeare’s Cultural Capital 400 Years after his Death. Changing English, Vol. 24, Issue. 1, p. 67.

    Maagerø, Lars Harald 2016. Metatheatrical levels of communication in a NorwegianA Midsummer Night's Dream. Shakespeare, Vol. 12, Issue. 1, p. 67.

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Book description

Taking a 'performance studies' perspective on Shakespearean theatre, W. B. Worthen argues that the theatrical event represents less an inquiry into the presumed meanings of the text than an effort to frame performance as a vehicle of cultural critique. Using contemporary performances as test cases, Worthen explores the interfaces between the origins of Shakespeare's writing as literature and as theatre, the modes of engagement with Shakespeare's plays for readers and spectators, and the function of changing performance technologies on our knowledge of Shakespeare. This book not only provides the material for performance analysis, but places important contemporary Shakespeare productions in dialogue with three influential areas of critical discourse: texts and authorship, the function of character in cognitive theatre studies, and the representation of theatre and performing in the digital humanities. This book will be vital reading for scholars and advanced students of Shakespeare and of performance studies.

Reviews

‘In a dazzling survey of cutting-edge contemporary Shakespeare performances, W. B. Worthen calls for a full embrace of the often provocative ‘noise' of modern Shakespearean performance, and does so with great erudition, analytical incisiveness, and sheer delight.'

Douglas Lanier - University of New Hampshire

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Works cited

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