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Stealth Democracy
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  • Cited by 355
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    This (lowercase (translateProductType product.productType)) has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Collins, Timothy P. 2018. Hypocrisy in American Political Attitudes. p. 159.

    Franc, Renata Perasović, Benjamin and Mustapić, Marko 2018. Understanding Youth Participation Across Europe. p. 227.

    Rodríguez Bolívar, Manuel Pedro 2018. User Centric E-Government. p. 137.

    Sabl, Andrew 2018. Morality, Governance, and Social Institutions. p. 131.

    Rodríguez Bolívar, Manuel Pedro 2018. Policy Analytics, Modelling, and Informatics. Vol. 24, Issue. , p. 267.

    Kohama, Shoko Inamasu, Kazunori and Tago, Atsushi 2017. To Denounce, or Not To Denounce: Survey Experiments on Diplomatic Quarrels. Political Communication, Vol. 34, Issue. 2, p. 243.


    Åström, Joachim Jonsson, Magnus E. and Karlsson, Martin 2017. Democratic Innovations: Reinforcing or Changing Perceptions of Trust?. International Journal of Public Administration, Vol. 40, Issue. 7, p. 575.


    Close, Caroline Kelbel, Camille and van Haute, Emilie 2017. What Citizens Want in Terms of Intra-Party Democracy: Popular Attitudes towards Alternative Candidate Selection Procedures. Political Studies, Vol. 65, Issue. 3, p. 646.


    Ugarriza, Juan E. and Nussio, Enzo 2017. The Effect of Perspective-Giving on Postconflict Reconciliation. An Experimental Approach. Political Psychology, Vol. 38, Issue. 1, p. 3.


    Cooper, Christopher A. and Reinagel, Tyler P. 2017. The Limits of Public Service Motivation: Confidence in Government Institutions Among Public Servants. Administration & Society, Vol. 49, Issue. 9, p. 1297.


    Kohlmeier, Jada and Saye, John 2017. Developing Discussion Leaders Through Scaffolded Lesson-Study. The Social Studies, Vol. 108, Issue. 1, p. 22.


    Coffé, Hilde and Bolzendahl, Catherine 2017. Avoiding the subject? Gender gaps in interpersonal political conflict avoidance and its consequences for political engagement. British Politics, Vol. 12, Issue. 2, p. 135.


    Reisinger, William M. Zaloznaya, Marina and Claypool, Vicki L. Hesli 2017. Does everyday corruption affect how Russians view their political leadership?. Post-Soviet Affairs, Vol. 33, Issue. 4, p. 255.


    VAN HAUWAERT, STEVEN M. and VAN KESSEL, STIJN 2017. Beyond protest and discontent: A cross-national analysis of the effect of populist attitudes and issue positions on populist party support. European Journal of Political Research,


    Christensen, Henrik Serup Himmelroos, Staffan and Grönlund, Kimmo 2017. Does Deliberation Breed an Appetite for Discursive Participation? Assessing the Impact of First-Hand Experience. Political Studies, Vol. 65, Issue. 1_suppl, p. 64.


    Arnesen, Sveinung 2017. Legitimacy from Decision-Making Influence and Outcome Favourability: Results from General Population Survey Experiments. Political Studies, Vol. 65, Issue. 1_suppl, p. 146.


    Bennett, W. Lance Segerberg, Alexandra and Knüpfer, Curd B. 2017. The democratic interface: technology, political organization, and diverging patterns of electoral representation. Information, Communication & Society, p. 1.


    Dvořák, Tomáš Zouhar, Jan and Novák, Jakub 2017. The Effect of Direct Democracy on Turnout. Political Research Quarterly, Vol. 70, Issue. 2, p. 433.


    Haas, Ingrid Johnsen Baker, Melissa N. and Gonzalez, Frank J. 2017. Who Can Deviate from the Party Line? Political Ideology Moderates Evaluation of Incongruent Policy Positions in Insula and Anterior Cingulate Cortex. Social Justice Research,


    Rockman, Bert A. 2017. The melting down of government: A multidecade perspective. Governance, Vol. 30, Issue. 1, p. 29.


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    Stealth Democracy
    • Online ISBN: 9780511613722
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511613722
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Book description

Americans often complain about the operation of their government, but scholars have never developed a complete picture of people's preferred type of government. In this provocative and timely book, Hibbing and Theiss-Morse, employing an original national survey and focus groups, report the governmental procedures Americans desire. Contrary to the prevailing view that people want greater involvement in politics, most citizens do not care about most policies and therefore are content to turn over decision-making authority to someone else. People's wish for the political system is that decision makers be empathetic and, especially, non-self-interested, not that they be responsive and accountable to the people's largely nonexistent policy preferences or, even worse, that the people be obligated to participate directly in decision making. Hibbing and Theiss-Morse conclude by cautioning communitarians, direct democrats, social capitalists, deliberation theorists, and all those who think that greater citizen involvement is the solution to society's problems.

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