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Stealth Democracy
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  • Cited by 227
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Åström, Joachim Jonsson, Magnus E. and Karlsson, Martin 2017. Democratic Innovations: Reinforcing or Changing Perceptions of Trust?. International Journal of Public Administration, p. 1.


    Atkinson, Michael M. White, Stephen Berdahl, Loleen and McGrane, David 2017. Are Canadians Stealth Democrats? An American Idea Comes North. American Review of Canadian Studies, Vol. 46, Issue. 1, p. 55.


    Braman, Eileen 2017. Exploring Citizen Assessments of Unilateral Executive Authority. Law & Society Review, Vol. 50, Issue. 1, p. 189.


    Carlson, Taylor N. and Settle, Jaime E. 2017. Political Chameleons: An Exploration of Conformity in Political Discussions. Political Behavior,


    Christensen, Henrik Serup Karjalainen, Maija and Lundell, Krister 2017. Democratic Innovations to the Rescue? Political Trust and Attitudes Toward Democratic Innovations in Southwest Finland. International Journal of Public Administration, Vol. 39, Issue. 5, p. 404.


    Coffé, Hilde and Bolzendahl, Catherine 2017. Avoiding the subject? Gender gaps in interpersonal political conflict avoidance and its consequences for political engagement. British Politics,


    Denk, Thomas and Christensen, Henrik Serup 2017. How to classify political cultures? A comparison of three methods of classification. Quality & Quantity, Vol. 50, Issue. 1, p. 177.


    Doherty, David Dowling, Conor M. and Miller, Michael G. 2017. When is Changing Policy Positions Costly for Politicians? Experimental Evidence. Political Behavior, Vol. 38, Issue. 2, p. 455.


    Egar, William T. 2017. Tarnishing Opponents, Polarizing Congress: The House Minority Party and the Construction of the Roll-Call Record. Legislative Studies Quarterly,


    Evans, Mark and Stoker, Gerry 2017. Political participation in Australia: contingency in the behaviour and attitudes of citizens. Australian Journal of Political Science, Vol. 51, Issue. 2, p. 272.


    Hafer, Joseph A. and Ran, Bing 2017. Developing a Citizen Perspective of Public Participation: Identity Construction as Citizen Motivation to Participate. Administrative Theory & Praxis, Vol. 38, Issue. 3, p. 206.


    Hart, Roderick P. and Curry, Alexander L. 2017. The Third Voice of American Politics. Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 46, Issue. 1, p. 73.


    Hayes, Matthew and Hibbing, Matthew V. 2017. The Symbolic Benefits of Descriptive and Substantive Representation. Political Behavior,


    Jennings, Will Stoker, Gerry and Twyman, Joe 2017. The Dimensions and Impact of Political Discontent in Britain. Parliamentary Affairs, p. gsv067.


    Kane, John V. 2017. Control, Accountability, and Constraints: Rethinking Perceptions of Presidential Responsibility for the Economy. Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 46, Issue. 2, p. 335.


    Moss, Jonathan Clarke, Nick Jennings, Will and Stoker, Gerry 2017. Golden age, apathy or stealth? Democratic engagement in Britain, 1945–1950. Contemporary British History, p. 1.


    Nicholson, Stephen P. Coe, Chelsea M. Emory, Jason and Song, Anna V. 2017. The Politics of Beauty: The Effects of Partisan Bias on Physical Attractiveness. Political Behavior,


    Oosterhoff, Benjamin and Metzger, Aaron 2017. Domain Specificity in Adolescents’ Concepts of Laws: Associations Among Beliefs and Behavior. Journal of Research on Adolescence,


    Robison, Joshua and Mullinix, Kevin J. 2017. Elite Polarization and Public Opinion: How Polarization Is Communicated and Its Effects. Political Communication, Vol. 33, Issue. 2, p. 261.


    Schillemans, Thomas van de Bovenkamp, Hester and Trappenburg, Margo 2017. Public Accountability and Health Care Governance.


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    Stealth Democracy
    • Online ISBN: 9780511613722
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511613722
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Book description

Americans often complain about the operation of their government, but scholars have never developed a complete picture of people's preferred type of government. In this provocative and timely book, Hibbing and Theiss-Morse, employing an original national survey and focus groups, report the governmental procedures Americans desire. Contrary to the prevailing view that people want greater involvement in politics, most citizens do not care about most policies and therefore are content to turn over decision-making authority to someone else. People's wish for the political system is that decision makers be empathetic and, especially, non-self-interested, not that they be responsive and accountable to the people's largely nonexistent policy preferences or, even worse, that the people be obligated to participate directly in decision making. Hibbing and Theiss-Morse conclude by cautioning communitarians, direct democrats, social capitalists, deliberation theorists, and all those who think that greater citizen involvement is the solution to society's problems.

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