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The Terrestrial Eocene-Oligocene Transition in North America
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  • Cited by 9
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Cadena, Edwin and Jaramillo, Carlos 2015. Early to Middle Miocene Turtles from the Northernmost Tip of South America: Giant Testudinids, Chelids, and Podocnemidids from the Castilletes Formation, Colombia. Ameghiniana, Vol. 52, Issue. 2, p. 188.

    PROTHERO, Donald R. 2014. Species longevity in North American fossil mammals. Integrative Zoology, Vol. 9, Issue. 4, p. 383.

    Westerhold, T. Röhl, U. Pälike, H. Wilkens, R. Wilson, P. A. and Acton, G. 2014. Orbitally tuned timescale and astronomical forcing in the middle Eocene to early Oligocene. Climate of the Past, Vol. 10, Issue. 3, p. 955.

    Westerhold, Thomas and Röhl, Ursula 2013. Orbital pacing of Eocene climate during the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum and the chron C19r event: Missing link found in the tropical western Atlantic. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 14, Issue. 11, p. 4811.

    Prothero, Donald R. 2011. Matthewlabis, new name forParalabisLull, 1921, preoccupied. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol. 31, Issue. 5, p. 1168.

    Prothero, Donald R. 2009. Evolutionary Transitions in the Fossil Record of Terrestrial Hoofed Mammals. Evolution: Education and Outreach, Vol. 2, Issue. 2, p. 289.

    Albright, L. Barry 2001. J. Alan Holman: Fossil Snakes of North America: Origin, Evolution, Distribution, Paleoecology. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol. 21, Issue. 1, p. 201.

    HOOKER, J. J. 2001. Tarsals of the extinct insectivoran family Nyctitheriidae (Mammalia): evidence for archontan relationships. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, Vol. 132, Issue. 4, p. 501.

    Van Valkenburgh, Blaire 1999. MAJOR PATTERNS IN THE HISTORY OF CARNIVOROUS MAMMALS. Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 27, Issue. 1, p. 463.

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Book description

During the transition from the Eocene to the Oligocene epochs, the mild tropical climates of the Paleocene and early Eocene were replaced by modern climatic conditions and extremes, including glacial ice in Antarctica. The best terrestrial record of the Eocene-Oligocene transition is found in North America, including the spectacular cliffs and spires of the Big Badlands National Park, in South Dakota. The first part of this book summarises the latest information in dating and correlation of the strata of late middle Eocene through early Oligocene age in North America, including the latest insights from argon/argon dating and magnetic stratigraphy. The second part reviews almost all the important terrestrial reptiles and mammals found near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary in the White River chronofauna, from the turtles, snakes and lizards to the common rodents, carnivores, artiodactyls, and perissodactyls. This is the first comprehensive treatment of these rocks and fossils in over sixty years and will be an invaluable resource to vertebrate palaeontologists, geologists, mammalogists and evolutionary biologists.

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