Skip to main content
×
Home
The Cambridge Ancient History
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 4
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    KADOWAKI, Seiji 2012. A Household Perspective towards the Pre-Pottery Neolithic to Late Neolithic Cultural Transformation in the Southern Levant. Orient, Vol. 47, p. 3.


    CADOGAN, G. 1978. DATING THE AEGEAN BRONZE AGE WITHOUT RADIOCARBON. Archaeometry, Vol. 20, Issue. 2, p. 209.


    O'Connor, David 1974. Political systems and archaeological data in Egypt: 2600–1780 B.C.. World Archaeology, Vol. 6, Issue. 1, p. 15.


    Vita-Finzi, C. 1973. Palaeolithic finds from Cyprus?.. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society, Vol. 39, p. 453.


    ×
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Recommend this book

    Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

    The Cambridge Ancient History
    • Online ISBN: 9781139054249
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521070515
    Please enter your name
    Please enter a valid email address
    Who would you like to send this to? *
    ×
  • Buy the print book

Book description

The present volume begins with an account of what is known about the remotest geological ages and comprises chapters on the different kinds of evidence concerning man and his physical environment up to the end of the Predynastic Period in Egypt and the parallel stages of development in Mesopotamia, Persia, Anatolia, Palestine, Cyprus, Greece and the Islands. To trace the history of these very early times it is necessary to rely chiefly on material remains, since writing had not then been invented. The text offers a setting against which the cultural progress of the historical epoch can be viewed. Archaeological investigation may be expected to bring to light more evidence to fill some of the present gaps in our knowledge, but already it is clear that the gulf between historical and prehistorical times in much of the ancient world is narrower than was once supposed.

    • Aa
    • Aa
Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send:
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×
  • CHAPTER I - THE GEOLOGICAL AGES
    pp 1-34
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521070515.002
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The perspective of history begins with the origin of the earth, and develops through geological time until the stage is ultimately set for human evolution. This chapter reviews some salient episodes in the history of the two rigid masses and the intervening Tethys, and some of the views on the drastic changes of Tertiary time that have provided the framework of the present relief. It would be natural to suppose that the waters of the Tethys which spread over parts of the Eurasian and Afrasian platforms may also have covered an intervening tract in which the crustal structure was of oceanic type. Such assemblages are known in the Pennine Alps, in the Pindus Mountains, in the Zagros Mountains of Iran and elsewhere. The chapter also discusses mountains, rivers and seas such as the Mediterranean Sea, since these features belong to the latest periods of geological time: the Miocene, Pliocene and Quaternary.
  • CHAPTER III - PRIMITIVE MAN IN EGYPT, WESTERN ASIA AND EUROPE IN PALAEOLITHIC TIMES
    pp 70-121
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521070515.004
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The earliest record of man's presence in Egypt is written in the ancient gravels and silts of the Nile. Western Asia today can be roughly divided into sea coast, mountain and desert, with one great fertile basin, the Valley of the Two Rivers. From the prehistoric point of view Western Asia can be divided into four regions. These are the coast and coastal ranges of Syria-Lebanon-Palestine, the mountains and high plateau of Anatolia, the North Arabian Desert, and the mountains of southern Kurdistān. Yet although, in some territories more markedly than in others, the Mesolithic peoples were in essence epi-Palaeolithic, they developed a number of features peculiar to their particular phase of prehistory. Over much of south-western Europe and North Africa the earlier Mesolithic peoples were essentially epi-Palaeolithic, showing few innovations and indeed in many instances displaying a more or less marked falling away from earlier standards.
  • CHAPTER V - THE EARLIEST POPULATIONS OF MAN IN EUROPE, WESTERN ASIA AND NORTHERN AFRICA
    pp 156-172
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521070515.006
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The Australopithecines were widespread in Africa and if, as some suggest, related forms were present in South-east Asia, they could well have occurred in the eastern Mediterranean area at some time. Although in the area under consideration, the Australopithecine and Pithecanthropine groups are as yet poorly represented, the material available for the later stages of human differentiation is more satisfactory. The date of the emergence of Homo sapiens is still a controversial matter, mainly because palaeoanthropologists are not agreed on the precise morphological criteria that serve to delimit the fossil representatives of this human species. By the close of the Bronze Age, the racial history of Europe, western Asia and northern Africa may thus be said to have consisted of the gradual infiltration into an initial stratum of longheaded Mediterranean peoples, widespread in distribution in Late Neolithic times, of round-headed varieties of man.
  • CHAPTER VI - CHRONOLOGY
    pp 173-247
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521070515.007
  • View abstract
    Summary
    For the fixing in time of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom and the periods preceding it the key date is the seventh year of the reign of King Sesostris III. The reigns of the kings of the First and Second Dynasties were recorded year by year on the recto of a stone tablet of Annals carved in the Fifth Dynasty and represented today by fragments in Palermo, Cairo, and London. The date of the First Dynasty of Babylon is based on observations of Venus made during the reign of the tenth king of that dynasty, Ammisaduqa. Of key importance for the chronology of this period is the problem of the date of Saustatar, king of Mitanni. In the Old Babylonian Period people have a firm new synchronism in unpublished texts from Mari. These speak of Seplarpak, king of Anshan, also called sukkal of Elam, as well as another Elamite ruler, Kudushulush.
  • (b) - ANATOLIA BEFORE 4000 B.C.
    pp 304-326
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521070515.009
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The term Anatolia is used throughout this division to describe Turkey in Asia, including Cilicia, but excluding the regions east of the Amanus and south of the eastern Taurus, the cultures of which are evidently more related to those of Syria and northern Mesopotamia. Exported to Syria and Palestine since late Natufian times, the obsidian trade enriched Neolithic Anatolia, and ensured steady contact with regions south of the Taurus, rich in tabular flint. By far the most spectacular contribution of the Early Chalcolithic period in Anatolia is its fine painted pottery. Whereas a Middle Chalcolithic can be established in Cilicia as an equivalent for Tell Halaf in Mesopotamia and Syria, no such obvious division is practicable in Western Anatolia. Material of the Beycesultan Late Chalcolithic period overlies Hacilar I at a number of sites in south-west Anatolia, virtually ruling out the theoretical possibility of an overlap.
  • (a) - PREDYNASTIC EGYPT
    pp 463-498
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521070515.011
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The Predynastic Period is the name given to the time before the first historical dynasty of Egypt as far back as people can trace an unbroken line of civilizations. The people who first ventured into the Nile Valley must have found a countryside very different from that of modern Egypt. Many of the shells used for personal ornaments came from the Persian Gulf. The civilization of Naqāda was discovered by Sir Flinders Petrie in the large cemeteries which he excavated near the modern village of Naqāda. The South Town of Naqada furnished the best collection of household flints at present known, but it is difficult to separate those of Naqāda I from those of Naqāda II. It must always be a precarious undertaking to deduce the religious beliefs of a people before the age of writing from the scanty material remains that have come down to people.
  • CHAPTER X - THE STONE AGE IN THE AEGEAN
    pp 557-618
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521070515.014
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The existence of a Neolithic culture in the Aegean area was first recognized during the opening years of this century. The excavators have noted specifically the similarity between the material from their Levels VII-V and that from the Seidi Cave; they would term both Late Palaeolithic and Mesolithic. In no sense can the material assemblage known thus far from the Greek Aceramic Neolithic sites compare with that known from the East. All of the previous Ceramic Neolithic period Sesklo Theochares considers as a very long Early Neolithic period, which he then divides into four phases, the last of which corresponds to the old Thessaly A period. Burials of the Middle Neolithic period have been found at three places in the Peloponnese. The discussion of Neolithic Crete quite separately from the rest of the Aegean is justified by the very different nature of its material culture, except perhaps in its latest phase.

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.


P. M. S.Blackett Comparisons of ancient climates with the ancient latitudes deduced from rock magnetism measurements.’ In Proc. Roy. Soc. A, 263 (1961), 1 ff.

J. V.Harrison and N. L.Falcon Gravity Collapse Structures and Mountain Ranges as exemplified in South-Western Iran.’ In Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London 92 (1936), 91 ff.

A. G.Ogilvie Physiography and Settlements in Southern Macedonia.’ In Geographical Review 11 (1921), 172 ff.

S. K.Runcorn Climatic change through geological time in the light of the palaeomagnetic evidence of polar wandering and continental drift.’ In Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 87 (1961), 282 ff.

L. R.Wager The Arun River Drainage Pattern and the Rise of the Himalaya.’ In Geographical Journal 89 (1937), 239 ff.

K. W.Butzer Some recent geological deposits in the Egyptian Nile Valley.’ In Geographical Journal 125 (1959), 75–9.

T.Jacobsen and R. M.Adams Salt and silt in ancient Mesopotamian agriculture.’ In Science, 128 (1958).

G. M.Lees and N. L.Falcon The geographical history of the Mesopotamian plains.’ In Geographical Journal 118 (1952), 24–39.

H. L.Movius Radiocarbon dates and Upper Palaeolithic archaeology in central and western Europe.’ In Current Anthropol. 1 (1960), 355–91.

J. G. D.Clark Blade and Trapeze Industries of the European Stone Age.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 24 (1958), 24 ff.

M.Degerbøl On a Find of a Preboreal Domestic Dog (Canis familiaris, L.) from Star Carr, Yorkshire, with Remarks on Other Mesolithic Dogs.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 27 (1961), 35 ff.

D. A. E.Garrod Excavations at the Cave of Shukba, Palestine, 1928.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 8 (1942), 1 ff.

H.Godwin Coastal Peat-beds of the North Sea Region, as Indices of Land and Sea-level Changes.’ In New Phytologist, 44 (1945), 29 ff.

H.Godwin and E. H.Willis Radiocarbon Dating of the Late-glacial Period in Britain.’ In Proc. Roy. Soc. ser. B, 150 (1959), 199 ff.

G. L.Harding Recent Discoveries in Jordan.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 90 (1958), 7 ff.

D. V. W.Kirkbride A Kebaran Rock-shelter in Wadi Madamagh, near Petra, Jordan.’ In Man, 58 (1958), 55 ff.

L.Picard Inferences on the Problem of the Pleistocene Climate of Palestine and Syria Drawn from the Flora, Fauna, and Stratigraphy.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 3 (1937), 58 ff.

R. S.Solecki Early Man in Cave and Village at Shanidar, Kurdistan, Iraq.’ In Transactions of the New York Academy of Sciences 21 (1959), 712 ff.

RalphS.Solecki Palaeoclimatology and Archaeology in the Near East.’ In Annual of the New York Academy of Sciences 95 (1961), 729 ff.

RalphS.Solecki Prehistory in Shanidar Valley, Northern Iraq.’ In Science 139 (1963), I79ff.

W. F.Albright Review of E. A.Speiser , Mesopotamian Origins. In Journal of the American Oriental Society 51 (1931), 60 ff.

M.Andronov Lexicostatistic Analysis of the Chronology of Disintegration of Proto-Dravidian.’ In Indo-Iranian Journal, 7 (1964), 170 ff.

C. D.Chrétien The Mathematical Models of Glottochronology.’ In Language, 38 (1962), 11ff.

A.Goetze The Linguistic Continuity of Anatolia as shown by the Proper Names.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 8 (1954), 72 ff.

A.Goetze Cilicians.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 16 (1962), 48 ff.

H.Hoijer Linguistic and Cultural Change.’ In Language, 24 (1948), 335 ff.

D. H.Hymes Lexicostatistics so far.’ In Current Anthropology, 1 (1960), 3 ff.

T.Jacobsen The Waters of Ur.’ In Iraq, 22 (1960), 174 ff.

R. B.Lees The Basis of Glottochronology.’ In Language, 29 (1953), 113 ff.

M.Mayrhofer Indo-iranisches Sprachgut aus Alalah.’ In Indo-Iranian Journal, 4 (1960), 136 ff.

A. L.Oppenheim The Seafaring Merchants of Ur.’ In Journal of the American Oriental Society 74 (1954), 6 ff.

M.Swadesh Linguistics as an Instrument of Prehistory.’ In Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 15 (1959), 20 ff.

P.Thieme The “Aryan” Gods of the Mitanni Treaties.’ In Journal of the American Oriental Society 80 (1960), 301 ff.

C.Arambourg A recent discovery in human palaeontology, Atlanthropus of Ternifine (Algeria).’ In Amer. J.phys. Anthrop. 13 (1955), 191 ff.

C.LoringBrace . ‘The fate of the “classic” Neanderthals: a consideration of hominid catastrophism.’ In Current Anthropology, 5 (1964), 3 ff.

G. W.Hewes , H.Irwin , M.Papworth and A.Saxe A New Fossil Human Population from the Wadi Haifa Area, Sudan.’ In Nature, 203 (1964), 341 ff.

F.Weidenreich The brain and its role in the phylogenetic transformation of the human skull.’ In Trans. Amer. Phil. Soc. 31 (1941), 321 ff.

F.Cornelius Chronology, eine Erwiederung.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 12 (1958), 101 ff.

G.Dossin Les archives économiques du palais de Mari.’ In Syria, 20 (1939). 97 ff.

E.Edel Neue keilschriftliche Umschreibungen ägyptischer Namen aus den Boghazköy Texten.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies. 7 (1948), 11 ff.

J. J.Finkelstein The Year-dates of Samsuditana.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 13 (1959), 39 ff.

A.Goetze The Kassites and Near Eastern Chronology.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 18 (1964),97 ff.

O. R.Gurney The Sultantepe Tablets.’ In Anatolian Studies 3 (1953), 15 ff.

W. W.Hallo Zāriqum.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies. 15 (1956), 220 ff.

E. L.Kohler and E. K.Ralph C-14 dates for sites in the Mediterranean area.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 65 (1961), 357 ff.

F. R.Kraus Nippur und Isin nach altbabylonischen Rechtsurkunden.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 3 (1951). For the chronology of the dynasties of Isin and Larsa, see 4 ff.

B.Landsberger Assyrische Königsliste und “Dunkles Zeitalter”.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 8 (1954), 31 ff. and 106 ff.

W.Nagel and E.Strohmenger Alalaḫ und Siegelkunst.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 12 (1958), 109 ff.

R. A.Parker The Lunar Dates of Thutmose III and Ramesses II.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies. 16 (1957), 39–43.

J. D. A.Pendlebury Egypt and the Aegean in the Late Bronze Age.’ In Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 16 (1930), 75 ff.

A.Poebel The Assyrian King List from Khorsabad.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 1 (1942), 247 ff., 466 ff.; and 2 (1943), 56 ff.

E.Reiner The Year-dates of Sumu-Yamutbal.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 15 (1961), 121 ff.

M. B.Rowton Tuppū in the Assyrian King Lists.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 18 (1959), 213 ff.

M. B.Rowton The Date of the Sumerian King-list.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 19 (1960), 156 ff.

M. B.Rowton The Material from Western Asia and the Chronology of the Nineteenth Dynasty.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 25 (1966), 240 ff.

S. S.Weinberg Aegean Chronology: Neolithic Period and Early Bronze Age.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 51 (1947), 165–82.

R. J.Braidwood , BruceHowe and C. A.Reed The Iranian prehistoric project.’ In Science, 133 (1961), 2008 ff.

R. J.Braidwood Near Eastern Prehistory.’ In Science, 127 (1958), 1419 ff.

U.Esin and P.Benedict Recent developments in the prehistory of Anatolia’. In Current Anthropology, 4, 4 (1963), 339 ff.

D. H.French Late Chalcolithic Pottery in Northwestern Turkey and the Aegean.’ In Anatolian Studies 11 (1961), 99 ff.

J.Mellaart Early cultures of the South Anatolian Plateau.’ In Anatolian Studies 11 (1961), 159 ff.

J.Mellaart Excavations at Hacilar: First Preliminary Report.’ In Anatolian Studies 8 (1958), 127 ff.

J.Mellaart Excavations at Çatal Hüyük, 1963; Third Preliminary Report.’ In Anatolian Studies 14 (1964).

B.de Cardi New wares and Fresh Problems from Baluchistan.’ In Antiquity 33 (1959). 15 ff.

C.Goff Excavations at Tall-i-Nokhodi.’ In Iran, 2 (1964), 41 ff.

H.Helbaek Ecological Effect of Irrigation in Ancient Mesopotamia.’ In Iraq, 22 (1960), 186 ff.

V.Hole , K. V.Flannery , J.Neely Early Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in Deh Luran, Iran.’ In Current Anthropology, 6, no. I (1965), 105 ff.

L.Le Breton The early periods at Susa: Mesopotamian relations.’ In Iraq, 19 (1957)

S.Lloyd and F.Safar Tell Uqair. Excavations by the Iraq Government Directorate of Antiquities in 1940 and 1941.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 2 (1943), 131 ff.

S.Lloyd Some Ancient Sites in the Jebel Sinjar District.’ In Iraq, 5 (1938), 123 ff.

M. E. L.Mallowan Excavations at Brak and Chagar Bazar.’ In Iraq, 9 (1947), 1 ff.

M. E. L.Mallowan Noah's Flood Reconsidered.’ In Iraq, 26 (1964), 62 ff.

M. E. L.Mallowan The ‘Amuq Plain.’ In Antiquity 37 (1963), 185 ff.

M. E. L.Mallowan The Excavations at Tall Chagar Bazar and an Archaeological Survey of the Habur Region. Second Campaign, 1936.’ In Iraq, 4 (1937), 91 ff.

M. E.L.Mallowan Excavations in the Balih Valley, 1938.’ In Iraq, 8 (1946), III ff.

J.Oates Ur and Eridu.’ In Iraq, 22 (1960)

A.Stein An Archaeological Tour in Ancient Persis.’ In Iraq, 3 (1936), III ff.

C. L.Woolley Excavations at Ur, 1929–30.’ In Antiquaries Journal 10 (1930), 315 ff.

E. J.Baumgartel What Do We Know about the Excavations at Merimda?’ In Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (no. 4, 1965), 502–11.

KarlW.Butzer Studien zum vor- und frühgeschichtlichen Landschaftswandel der Sahara. III. Die Naturlandschaft Ãgyptens während der Vorgeschichte und der Dynastischen Zeit. In Abhandlungen der Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Math- naturwiss. Klasse, Math.-Naturwiss. Kl. Jahrg. 1959, Nr..

J.Capart Primitive Art in Egypt. London, 1905.

H.Case and J.Crowfoot Payne Tomb 100: The Decorated Tomb at Hierakonpolis.’ In Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 48 (1962), 5–18.

H. J.Kantor The Final Phase of Predynastic Culture, Gerzean or Semainean?’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 3 (1944), 110–36.

H. J.Kantor Further Evidence for Early Mesopotamian Relations with Egypt.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies. 11 (1952), 239 ff.

H. J.Kantor The Early Relations of Egypt with Asia.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 1 (1942), 174–213.

G. A.Wainwright The Red Crown in Early Prehistoric Times.’ In Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 9 (1923), 26–33.

R. J.Braidwood Jericho and its Setting in Near Eastern History.’ In Antiquity 31 (1957). ff.

E. C.Broome The Dolmens of Palestine and Transjordania.’ In Journal of Biblical Literature and Exegesis 59 (1940), 479 ff.

G.Fitzgerald Excavations at Beth-Shan in 1933.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 1934, 123 ff.

J.Kaplan Two Chalcolithic Vessels from Palestine.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 86 (1954), 97 ff.

D.Kirkbride The Excavation of a Neolithic Village at Seyl Aqlat, Beidha, near Petra.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 92 (1960), 136 ff.

R. A. S.Macalister Report on the Excavations of Gezer.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 34 (1902), 317 ff.

J.Perrot Les deux premières campagnes de fouilles à Munhatta.’ In Syria, 41 (1964), 323 ff.; ‘La troisième campagne …’ In Syria, 43 (1966), 49 ff.

J.Perrot Statuettes en ivoire et autres objets en ivoire et en os provenant des gisements préhistoriques de la région de Béershéba.’ In Syria, 36 (1959), 8 ff.

S.Benton Hagios Nikolaos near Astakos in Akarnania.’ In Annual of the British School at Athens 42 (1947), 156–83.

P. A.Bialor and M. H.Jameson Palaeolithic in the Argolid.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 66 (1962), 181–2.

C. W.Blegen Excavations at Nemea 1926.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 31 (1927), 421–40.

R. J.Braidwood The Agricultural Revolution.’ In Scientific American, 203 (Sept. 1960), 130–48.

J. R.Cann and C.Renfrew The Characterization of Obsidian and its Application to the Mediterranean Region.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 30 (1964), 111–33.

J. L.Caskey Excavations at Lerna, 1956.’ In Hesperia, 26 (1957), 142–62.

J. L.Caskey Excavations at Lerna, 1957.’ In Hesperia, 27 (1958), 125–44.

JohnL.Caskey Neolithic Sherds from Thespiai.’ In Hesperia, 20 (1951), 289–90.

J. L.Caskey Excavations in Keos, 1964–1965.’ In Hesperia, 35 (1966), 363.

S. I.Dakaris , E. S.Higgs and R. W.Hey The Climate, Environment and Industries of Stone Age Greece: Part I.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 30 (1964), 199–244.

J. D.Evans Excavations in the Neolithic Settlement of Knossos, 1957–60. Part I.’ In Annual of the British School at Athens 59(1964).

D. H.French Excavations at Can Hasan. Second Preliminary Report, 1962.’ In Anatolian Studies 13 (1963), 29–42.

A.Furness The Neolithic Pottery of Knossos.’ In Annual of the British School at Athens 48 (1953), 94–134.

E. J.Holmberg The Appearance of Neolithic Black Burnished Ware in Mainland Greece.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 68 (1964), 343–8.

W.Lamb Schliemann's Prehistoric Sites in the Troad.’ In Praehistorische Zeitschrift 23 (1932), 111–31.

A.Leroi-Gourhan Découvertes paléolithiques en Élide.’ In Bulletin de Correspondance hellénique 88 (1964), 1–8.

S.Lloyd and F.Safar Tell Hassuna. Excavations by the Iraq Government Directorate of Antiquities in 1943 and 1944, with prefatory remarks by Robert J. Braidwood.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 4 (1945), 255 ff.

J.Mellaart Excavations at Çatal Hüyük: Second Preliminary Report, 1962.’ In Anatolian Studies 13 (1963)

J.Mellaart Notes on the Architectural Remains of Troy I and II.’ In Anatolian Studies 9 (1959), 131–62.

H. S.Robinson and S. S.Weinberg Excavations at Corinth, 1959.’ In Hesperia, 29 (1960), 225–53.

J.Servais Outils paléolithiques d'Élide.’ In Bulletin de Correspondance hellénique 85 (1961), 1–9.

H.Waterhouse Prehistoric Laconia: A Note.’ In Annual of the British School at Athens 51 (1956).

H.Waterhouse and R.Hope Simpson Prehistoric Laconia: Part I, Part II.’ In Annual of the British School at Athens 55 (1960), 67–107; 56 (1961), 114–75.

S. S.Weinberg Remains from Prehistoric Corinth.’ In Hesperia, 6 (1937), 487–524.

A. J.Arkell Early Shipping in Egypt.’ In Antiquity 33 (1959), 52–3.

Arkell, Antiquaries JournalThe Sudan Origin of Predynastic “Black Incised” Pottery.’ In Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 39 (1953), 76–9.

W. M.Austin Is Armenian an Anatolian Language?’ In Language, 18 (1942)

E B.Bailey The Desert Shores of the Chalk Seas.’ In Geological Magazine 61 (1924)

R. D.Barnett Early Shipping in the Near East.’ In Antiquity 32 (1958), 220–30.

D. M. A.Bate The Fossil Antelopes of Palestine in Natufian (Mesolithic Times).’ In Geological Magazine 77 (1940), 418 ff.

W. C.Benedict Urartians and Hurrians.’ In Journal of the American Oriental Society 80 (1960)

C. W.Blegen The Geographical Distribution of Prehistoric Remains in Greece.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 32 (1928)

R. J.Braidwood and L. S. et al. ‘Matarrah.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 11 (1952)

W. S.Broecker and J. L.Kulp The Radiocarbon Method of Age Determination.’ In American Antiquity, 22 (1956).

B.Buchanan On the Seal Impressions on some Old Babylonian Tablets.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 11 (1957)

E. D.Buren van . ‘Places of Sacrifice (Opferstätten).’ In Iraq, 14 (1952).

C. A.Burney Excavations at Yanik Tepe, Azerbaijan.’ In Iraq, 26 (1964), 54, ff.

K. W.Butzer Archaeology and geology in Ancient Egypt: Geomorphological analysis permits reconstruction of the geography of prehistoric settlement.’ In Science, 132 (1960), 1617–24.

K. W.Butzer Pleistocene palaeoclimates of the Kurkur Oasis, Egypt.’ In Canadian Geographer, 8 (1964).

K. W.Butzer and C. L.Hansen On Pleistocene evolution of the Nile Valley in southern Egypt.’ In Canadian Geographer, 9 (1965).

KarlW.Butzer Studien zum vor- und frühgeschichtlichen Landschaftswandel der Sahara. III. Die Naturlandschaft Ãgyptens während der Vorgeschichte und der Dynastischen Zeit. In Abhandlungen der Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Math- naturwiss. Klasse, Math.-Naturwiss. Kl. Jahrg. 1959, Nr. 2.

L. H. D.Buxton Worked Flints from the N. Arabian Desert.’ In Antiquaries Journal 6 (1926)

J. A.Callaway The Gezer Crematorium Re-examined.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 94 (1964),104 ff.

J. L.Caskey Activities at Lerna, 1958–1959.’ In Hesperia, 28 (1959).

J. L.Caskey Excavations in Keos, 1960–61.’ In Hesperia, 31 (1962), 263–83.

J. L.Caskey Excavations in Keos, 1963.’ In Hesperia, 33 (1964).

J. L.Caskey and E. G.Caskey The Earliest Setdements at Eutresis: Supplementary Excavations, 1958.’ In Hesperia, 29 (1960).

J. L.Caskey and M.Eliot A Neolithic Figurine from Lerna.’ In Hesperia, 25 (1956).

G.Caton-Thompson The Levalloisian Industries of Egypt.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 12 (1946)

N.Chavaillon and J. and F.Hours Une industrie paléolithique du Péloponnese: Le Moustérien de Vasilaki.’ In Bulletin de Correspondance hellénique 88 (1964).

V. G.Childe Civilization, Cities and Towns.’ In Antiquity 31 (1957), 36 ff.

V. G.Childe On the Date and Origin of Minyan Ware.’ In Journal of Hellenic Studies 35 (1915)

J. G. D.Clark A Microlithic Industry from the Cambridgeshire Fenland.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 21 (1955), 3 ff.

J. G. D.Clark Neolithic Bows from Somerset, England, and the Prehistory of Archery in North-western Europe.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 29 (1963).

J. G. D.Clark and W. F.Rankine Excavations at Farnham, Surrey (1937–1938), the Horsham Culture and the Question of Mesolithic Dwellings. In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 5 (1939)

I. W.Cornwall The Pre-Pottery Neolithic Burials, Jericho.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 88 (1956) ff.

C.Delvoye Remarques sur la seconde civilisation néolithique du continent grec et des îles avoisinantes.’ In Bulletin de Correspondance hellénique 73 (1949).

E.Edel Die Abfassungszeit des Briefes K.Bo. I 10 (Hattušil-Kadašman-Ellil) und seine Bedeutung für die Chronologie Ramses' II.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 12 (1958).

W. F.Edgerton Chronology of the Twelfth Dynasty.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies. 1 (1942).

W. F.Edgerton Critical Note on the Chronology of the Early Eighteenth Dynasty (Amenhotep I toThutmose III).’ In American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literatures. 53 (1937).

F. J.Ewing Preliminary Note on the Excavations at the Palaeolithic Site of Ksâr Akil.’ In Antiquity 21 (1947)

S. D.Feigin and B.Landsberger The Date List of the Babylonian King Samsu-ditana.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies. 14 (1955)

D. H.French Excavations at Can Hasan; Fourth Preliminary Report, 1964.’ In Anatolian Studies 15 (1965).

D. H.French Excavations at Can Hasan; Third Preliminary Report, 1963.’ In Anatolian Studies 14 (1964).

D. H.French Prehistoric pottery from Macedonia and Thrace.’ In Praehistorische Zeitschrift. 42 (1964).

J.Friedrich Kleinasiatische Sprachdenkmäler (Kleine Texte, 163). Berlin, 1932.

A.Furness Some early pottery of Samos, Kalimnos, and Chios.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 22 (1956), 173 ff.

C. J.Gadd Tablets from Chagar Bazar and Tall Brak, 1937–38.’ In Iraq, 7 (1940)

A. H.Gardiner Regnal Years and Civil Calendar in Pharaonic Egypt.’ In Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. 31 (1945).

D. A. E.Garrod Excavations at the Mugharet Kebara, Mount Carmel, 1931: the Aurignacian Industries.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 20 (1954), 155 ff.

D. A. E.Garrod and E. W.Gardner Pleistocene Coastal Deposits in Palestine.’ In Nature, 135 (1935).

I. J.Gelb Two Assyrian King Lists.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies. 13 (1954)

D.Gilead Burial Customs and the Dolmen Problem.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 1968 ff.

S. R. K.Glanville Egyptian Theriomorphic Vessels in the British Museum.’ In Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 12 (1926).

A.Goetze On the Chronology of the Second Millennium b.c. ’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 11, (1957)

C.Goff Excavations at Tall-i-Nokhodi.’ In Iran, 1 (1963)

H. G.Güterbock The Deeds of Suppiluliuma, as told by his Son, Mursili II.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 10 (1956)

E. H.Hammond Small-scale continental land form maps.’ In Annals of the Association of American Geographers 44 (1954).

R.Harris The Archive of the Sin Temple in Khafajah (Tutub).’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 9 (1955)

H.Helbaek Domestication of food plants in the Old World.’ In Science, 130 (1959), 365–72.

H.Helbaek First impressions of the Çatal Hüyiük plant husbandry.’ In Anatolian Studies 14 (1964)

E. S.Higgs A Hand Axe from Greece.’ In Antiquity 38 (1964).

E. S.Higgs A Middle Palaeolithic Industry in Greece: Preliminary Report.’ In Man, 63 (1963).

E. S.Higgs Asprochaliko.’ In Antiquity 40, no. 157 (March 1966), 55–6.

E. S.Higgs Some Pleistocene Faunas of the Mediterranean Coastal Areas.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 27 (1961)

E. S.Higgs The Excavation of a Late Mesolithic Site at Downton, near Salisbury, Wilts.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 25 (1959)

E. S.Higgs and D. R.Brothwell North Africa and Mount Carmel: recent developments.’ In Man, 61 (1961), article 166

E. S.Higgs and C.Vita-Finzi The Climate, Environment and Industries of Stone Age Greece: Part II.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 32 (1966).

D. A.Holm Desert geomorphology in the Arabian Peninsula.’ In Science, 132 (1960), 1369–79.

G.Horsfield Dolmen-field in Transjordania.’ In Antiquity 7 (1933), 471 ff.

T.Jacobsen The Reign of Ibbi-Suen.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 7 (1953)

S. A.Kansu Stone-age Cultures in Turkey.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 51 (1947)

H. J.Kantor Syro-Palestinian Ivories.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies. 15 (1956)

K. M.Kenyon Excavations at Jericho.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 84 (1952) ff.; (1953) ff.; (1954) ff.; (1955) ff.; (1956) ff; (1957) ff; (1960) ff.

K. M.Kenyon Reply to Professor Braidwood.’ In Antiquity 31 (1957), 82 ff.

K.Kenyon Jericho and its Setting in Near Eastern History.’ In Antiquity 30 (1956).

K.Kenyon Earliest Jericho.’ In Antiquity 33 (1959)

D.Kirkbride A Brief Report on the Pre-Pottery Flint Cultures of Jericho.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 92 (1960) ff

D.Kirkbride Five Seasons at the Pre-Pottery Neolithic Village of Beidha in Jordan.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 98 (1966) ff.

W.Leslau South-East Semitic (Ethiopic and South Arabic).’ In Journal of the American Oriental Society 63 (1943).

S.Lloyd Iraq Government Soundings at Sinjar.’ In Iraq, 7 (1940)

S.Lloyd Ur-Al ‘Ubaid, Uqair and Eridu.’ In Iraq, 22 (1960), 23 ff.

D.Mackenzie The Pottery of Knossos.’ In Journal of Hellenic Studies. 23 (1903).

M. E. L.Mallowan The Excavations at Tall Chagar Bazar and an Archaeological Survey of the Habur Region, 1934–5.’ In Iraq, 3 (1936)

V. M.Masson The First Farmers in Turkmenia.’ In Antiquity 35 (1961), 203 ff.

R.Maxwell-Hyslop , J.PlatTaylor du , M. V.Seton-Williams and J.Waechter . ‘An Archaeological Survey of the Plain of Jabbul, 1939.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly (1942), 8 ff.

C. B. M.McBurney Preliminary Report on the Stone Age Reconnaissance in North-eastern Iran.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 30 (1964)

W. A.McDonald and R.Hope Simpson Prehistoric Habitation in South-western Peloponnese.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 65 (1961).

J.Mellaart Çatal Hüyük West.’ In Anatolian Studies 15 (1965).

J.Mellaart Excavations at Çtal Hüyük, 1965; Fourth Preliminary Report.’ In Anatolian Studies 16 (1966).

J.Mellaart Excavations at Çatal Hüyük.’ In Anatolian Studies 12 (1962), 41 ff; 13 (1963), 43 ff; 14 (1964), 39 ff

J.Mellaart Excavations at Hacilar: Second Preliminary Report.’ In Anatolian Studies 9 (1959). 51 ff.

J.Mellaart Excavations at Hacilar. Third Preliminary Report, 1959.’ In Anatolian Studies 10 (1960), 83–104.

J.Mellaart Excavations at Hacilar.’ In Anatolian Studies 11 (1961), 39 ff.

J.Mellaart Preliminary Report on a survey of Pre-classical remains in Southern Turkey.’ In Anatolian Studies 4 (1954)

M. J.Mellink Archaeology in Asia Minor: Urfa-Diyarbakir area.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 69 (1965)

HallamMovius . The Irish Stone Age. Cambridge, 1942.

G. E.Mylonas The Site of Akropotamos and the Neolithic Period of Macedonia.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 45 (1941).

O.Neugebauer The Chronology of the Hammurabi Age.’ In Journal of the American Oriental Society 61 (1941).

R.Neuville and A.Mallon Les débuts de l'âge des métaux dans les grottes du Désert de Judée.’ In Syria, 12 (1931) ff.

H.Pedersen Linguistic Science in the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge (U.S.A.), 1931.

H. W.Pendlebury , J. D. S.Pendlebury and M. B.Money-Coutts Excavations in the Plain of Lasithi. I. The Cave of Trapeza.’ In Annual of the British School at Athens 36 (1935/1936), 5–131

J.Perrot Le NÉolithique d'Abu-Gosh.’ In Syria, 29 (1952) ff.

J.Perrot Têtes de flèches du Natoufien et du Tahounien (Palestine).’ In Bulletin de la Société préhistorique française 49 (1952) ff.

D. B.Redford The Coregency of Tuthmosis III and Amenophis III.’ In Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 51 (1965).

Ch.Reed Osteological evidences for prehistoric domestication in south-west Asia.’ In Zeitschriftfür Tierzüchtung, 76 (1961), 31 ff.

RobertJ.Rodden Excavations at the Early Neolithic Site at Nea Nikomedeia, Greek Macedonia (1961 Season).’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 28 (1962).

M. B.Rowton Comparative Chronology at the Time of Dynasty XIX.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 19 (1960)

M. B.Rowton Manetho's Date for Ramesses II.’ In Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. 34 (1948).

M. B.Rowton Mesopotamian Chronology and the Era of Menophres.’ In Iraq, 8 (1946)

M. B.Rowton The Background of the Treaty between Ramesses II and Hattušiliš’ III.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 13 (1959)

M. B.Rowton The Date of Hammurabi.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies. 17 (1958).

M. B.Rowton The Problem of the Exodus.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly, 1953

K. S.Sandford Problems of the Nile Valley.’ In Geographical Review 26 (1936).

S.Sauneron La tradition officielle relative à la XVIIIe Dynastie d'aprés un ostracon de la Vallé'e des Rois.’ In Chronique d'Égypte. 26 (1951), 46–9.

C. F. A.Schaeffer À propos de la chronologie de la Xlle Dynastie égyptienne et des Hyksos.’ In Chronique d'Égypte. 22 (1947), 225–9.

S. D.Simmons Early Old Babylonian Tablets from Harmal and elsewhere.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 13 (1959)

H. S.Smith Egypt and C 14 Dating.’ In Antiquity 38 (1964).

SidneySmith . ‘Middle Minoan I–II and Babylonian Chronology.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 49 (1945)

W. S.Smith Inscriptional Evidence for the History of the Fourth Dynasty.’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies. 11 (1952).

R. S.Solecki Cave-art in Kürtiün Ini, a Taurus Mountain site in Turkey.’ In Man (1964) f.

E.Sollberger New Lists of the Kings of Ur and Isin.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 8 (1954) f.

G.Soteriades Fouilles préhistoriques en Phocide.’ In Revue des études grecques 25 (1912), 253–99.

D. B.Stronach ‘Excavations at Ras’ al ‘Amiya.’ In Iraq, 23 (1961)

H.Tadmor Historical Implications of the Correct Rendering of Akkadian dǍku .’ In Journal of Near Eastern Studies 17 (1958)

M. W.Thompson Azilian Harpoons.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 20 (1954), 193 ff.

I. A.Todd The obsidian industry of Avla Daǧ.’ In Anatolian Studies 15 (1965), 95 ff.

N.Tzori Neolithic and Chalcolithic Sites in the Valley of Beth-Shan.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly (1958).

E.Vignard Une nouvelle industrie lithique : le Sébilien.’ In Bulletin de la Société préhistorique française 25 (1928)

J. C.Vogel and H. T.Waterbolk Groningen Radiocarbon Dates IV.’ In Radiocarbon, 5 (1963).

A. J. B.Wace and C. W.Blegen The Pre-Mycenaean Pottery of the Mainland.’ In Annual of the British School at Athens 22 (1916–18), 175 ff.

Wainwright, Geographical JournalThe Microlithic Industries of Wales.’ In Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 29 (1963), 99–132.

S. S.Weinberg A Cross-section of Corinthian Antiquities.’ In Hesperia, 17 (1948).

S. S.Weinberg Excavations at Prehistoric Elateia, 1959.’ In Hesperia, 31 (1962).

S. S.Weinberg Neolithic Figurines and Aegean Interrelations.’ In American Journal of Archaeology 55 (1951), 121–33.

Th.A.Wertime Man's first encounter with metallurgy.’ In Science, 146 (1964)

D. J.Wiseman Abban and Alalaḫ.’ In Journal of Cuneiform Studies 12 (1958)

C. L.Woolley The Prehistoric Pottery of Carchemish,’ In Iraq, 1 (1934)

F.Zeuner Dog and Cat in the Neolithic of Jericho.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 90 (1958) ff.

F.Zeuner The Goats of Early Jericho.’ In Palestine Exploration Quarterly 87 (1955) ff.