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The Cambridge Companion to British Black and Asian Literature (1945–2010)
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    The Cambridge Companion to British Black and Asian Literature (1945–2010)
    • Online ISBN: 9781316488546
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCO9781316488546
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Book description

This Companion offers a comprehensive account of the influence of contemporary British Black and Asian writing in British culture. While there are a number of anthologies covering Black and Asian literature, there is no volume that comparatively addresses fiction, poetry, plays and performance, and provides critical accounts of the qualities and impact within one book. It charts the distinctive Black and Asian voices within the body of British writing and examines the creative and cultural impact that African, Caribbean and South Asian writers have had on British literature. It analyzes literary works from a broad range of genres, while also covering performance writing and non-fiction. It offers pertinent historical context throughout, and new critical perspectives on such key themes as multiculturalism and evolving cultural identities in contemporary British literature. This Companion explores race, politics, gender, sexuality, identity, amongst other key literary themes in Black and Asian British literature. It will serve as a key resource for scholars, graduates, teachers and students alike.

Reviews

'This volume meets the high standards we expect from the Cambridge Companion series. Each contributor is an academic with expertise in the area on which they write. Each chapter is engagingly and accessibly written, providing a necessarily selective overview of the subject.'

Linda Kemp Source: Languages and Literature

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.


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