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The Independence of Spanish America
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  • Cited by 25
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Bohn, Simone 2018. Dominant Elites in Latin America. p. 57.

    Mulich, Jeppe 2017. International Origins of Social and Political Theory. Vol. 32, Issue. , p. 181.

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    Markoff, John 2016. On the Cross Road of Polity, Political Elites and Mobilization. Vol. 24, Issue. , p. 121.

    Ossa Santa Cruz, Juan Luis 2016. 1814 en Chile: de la desobediencia a Lima a la ruptura con España. Anuario de Estudios Americanos, Vol. 73, Issue. 1, p. 231.

    Kamp, Andreas 2015. Vom Paläolithikum zur Postmoderne – Die Genese unseres Epochen-Systems. Vol. 56, Issue. ,

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    Núñez, Gabriel González 2014. When a Translator Joins the Revolution: A Paratextual Analysis of Manuel García de Sena’s La independencia. TTR : traduction, terminologie, rédaction, Vol. 27, Issue. 1, p. 189.

    Smith, Miles 2013. From Savannah to Vienna: William Henry Stiles, the Revolutions of 1848, and Southern Conceptions of Order. American Nineteenth Century History, Vol. 14, Issue. 1, p. 27.

    Ricketts, Mónica 2012. The Rise of the Bourbon Military in Peru, 1768–1820. Colonial Latin American Review, Vol. 21, Issue. 3, p. 413.

    PILCHER, Jeffrey M. 2012. Eating à la Criolla : Global and Local Foods in Argentina, Cuba, and Mexico. IdeAs,

    Brooks, Alasdair and Rodríguez, Ana Cristina Y 2012. A Venezuelan household clearance assemblage of 19th-century British ceramics in international perspective. Post-Medieval Archaeology, Vol. 46, Issue. 1, p. 70.

    Rodríguez Y, Ana Cristina and Brooks, Alasdair 2012. Speaking in Spanish, Eating in English; Ideology and Meaning in Nineteenth-Century British Transfer Prints in Barcelona, Anzoátegui State, Venezuela. Historical Archaeology, Vol. 46, Issue. 3, p. 47.

    Andrien, Kenneth J. 2011. History and Language in the Andes. p. 113.

    Archer, Christon I. 2011. The Encyclopedia of War.

    Roca, José Luis 2011. Ni con Lima ni con Buenos Aires. p. 727.

    Pubols, Louise 2010. A Companion to Los Angeles. p. 20.

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Book description

This book provides a new interpretation of the process of Spanish American independence (1808–26); one which emphasises political processes and cultural continuities, instead of the break with Spain. It is the first book to examine the representative government and popular elections introduced by the Spanish Constitution of 1812. Rodríguez argues that independence did not constitute an anti-colonial movement, as many scholars assert, but rather formed part of the broader Spanish political revolution. In America, a struggle over who would govern accompanied this revolution. Despite significant participation by the masses, the struggle for independence resulted in the triumph of the criollos, the New World bourgeoisie. The liberal tradition of constitutional, representative government that emerged during this period, together with the achievement of nationhood, constitutes the most significant heritage of Spanish American independence.

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