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The Origin of Animal Body Plans
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    Frazzetta, T. H. 2012. Flatfishes, Turtles, and Bolyerine Snakes: Evolution by Small Steps or Large, or Both?. Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 39, Issue. 1, p. 30.

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    Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac 2009. Looking at the origin of phenotypic variation from pattern formation gene networks. Journal of Biosciences, Vol. 34, Issue. 4, p. 573.

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    The Origin of Animal Body Plans
    • Online ISBN: 9781139174596
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139174596
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Book description

Neo-Darwinism currently occupies a dominant position in evolutionary thought. While this theory has considerable explanatory power, it is widely recognized as being incomplete in that it lacks a component dealing with individual development, or ontogeny. This is particularly conspicuous in relation to attempts to explain the evolutionary origin of the 35 or so animal body plans, and of the developmental trajectories that generate them. This book examines both the origin of body plans in particular and the evolution of animal development in general. In doing so, it ranges widely, covering topics as diverse as comparative developmental genetics, selection theory and Vendian/Cambrian fossils. Particular emphasis is placed on gene duplication, changes in spatio-temporal gene-expression patterns, internal selection, coevolution of interacting genes, and coadaptation. The book will be of particular interest to students and researchers in evolutionary biology, genetics, paleontology and developmental biology.

Reviews

‘… useful and thought provoking.’

Michael K. Richardson Source: Heredity

‘I strongly recommend it to anyone with an interest in where evolutionary biology is going next.’

John A. Lee Source: Biologist

‘… an interesting and intelligent book.’

Anthony Graham Source: BSDB Newsletter

' … a readable and enjoyable account of the current state of developmental genetics.'

Source: BioEssays

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