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Dependency in the Twenty-First Century?

The Political Economy of China-Latin America Relations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 January 2020

Barbara Stallings
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island

Summary

The way external forces influence political and economic outcomes in developing countries is an ongoing concern of scholars and policymakers. In the 1970s and 1980s, dependency analysis was a popular way of approaching this topic, but it later fell into disrepute. This Element argues that it may be useful to revamp dependency to interpret China's new relationships with developing countries, including Latin America. Economic links with China have become important determinants of the region's development. Stallings discusses the dependency debates, reviews the way dependency operated in the US-Latin American case, and analyzes the growing Chinese presence within a dependency framework.
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Online ISBN: 9781108875141
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 06 February 2020

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