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Hindu Monotheism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 July 2020

Gavin Dennis Flood
Affiliation:
Yale University, Connecticut

Summary

If by monotheism we mean the idea of a single transcendent God who creates the universe out of nothing (creatio ex nihilo), as in the Abrahamic religions, then that is not found in the history of Hinduism. But if we mean a supreme, transcendent deity who impels the universe, sustains it and ultimately destroys it before causing it to emerge once again, who is the ultimate source of all other gods who are her or his emanations, then this idea does develop within that history. It is a Hindu monotheism and its nature that is the topic of this Element.
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Online ISBN: 9781108584289
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 20 August 2020

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