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Religious Terrorism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 June 2020

Heather S. Gregg
Affiliation:
Naval Postgraduate School

Summary

How can the world's religions, which propagate peace and love, promote violence and the killing of innocent civilians through terrorist acts? This Element aims to provide insights into this puzzle by beginning with a brief overview of debates on terrorism, a discussion on religion and the various resources it provides groups engaging in terrorist acts, four arguments for what causes religious terrorism, brief examples of religious terrorism across faith traditions, and a synopsis of deradicalization programs. This discussion shows that, when combined with certain political and social circumstances, religions provide powerful resources for justifying and motivating terrorist acts against civilians.
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Online ISBN: 9781108583992
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 16 July 2020

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Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Religious Terrorism
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Save element to Dropbox

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Religious Terrorism
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Save element to Google Drive

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Religious Terrorism
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