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How Tribal Consultation and Non-Invasive Techniques Led to a Better Understanding of Vázquez de Coronado’s Expedition of 1540–1542

  • Matthew F. Schmader (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

Archaeological site management goals, when informed by the input of traditional communities, can result in very different outcomes than standard cultural resource investigation strategies. A case example is presented for a large site in Albuquerque, New Mexico, containing material from the Francisco Vázquez de Coronado expedition. From 1540 to 1542, Coronado led one of the largest and most well-known explorations of the American southwest. The expedition spent much time in the Rio Grande Valley near present-day Albuquerque, including the site of Piedras Marcadas Pueblo. Formal consultations between local tribes and the City of Albuquerque in the 1990s generated a research program using geophysics and non-invasive techniques. Geophysical investigation produced results that would not have been obtained without tribal consultation to guide the research from an early point. By combining architectural data found by resistivity surveys with artifact distributions found by metal detection, details of a battle between Coronado’s expedition and puebloan people have emerged. Ongoing tribal consultation has shed light on the events that occurred at Piedras Marcadas and continues to inform interpretation and site management decisions. Resulting cooperation between traditional communities and the City of Albuquerque is a case study in the ever-important practices of co-creation and collaborative archaeology.

Objetivos de manejo del sitio, cuando informados por la contribución de las comunidades tradicionales, pueden tener resultados muy diferentes que cuando se usa las estrategias estándares de la investigación de recursos culturales. Se presenta un ejemplo de caso de un sitio grande en Albuquerque, Nuevo México que contiene material que pertenece a la expedición de Francisco Vázquez de Coronado. De 1540 a 1542, Coronado dirigió una de las exploraciones más grandes y más conocidas del suroeste de los Estados Unidos Americanos. La expedición pasó mucho tiempo en el valle del Río Grande cerca de la ciudad que actualmente es Albuquerque, incluyendo el sitio de “Piedras Marcadas Pueblo.” Consultas formales entre los tribus locales y el gobierno de la ciudad de Albuquerque en la década de 1990 generaron un programa de investigación que utiliza la geofísica y las técnicas no-invasivas. La investigación geofísica produjo resultados que no se habrían obtenido sin la consulta tribal para guiar la investigación desde los momentos principales. Al combinar los datos arquitectónicos encontrados por los estudios de resistividad con las distribuciones de artefactos encontrados por detección de metales, se han surgido detalles de una batalla entre la expedición de Coronado y la gente “Pueblo.” Consulta continua con las poblaciones indígenas ha arrojado luz sobre los hechos ocurridos en Piedras Marcadas, y continúa de informar sobre las decisiones de interpretación y manejo del sitio. La cooperación que se resultó entre las comunidades tradicionales y la ciudad de Albuquerque es un caso de estudio de las prácticas cada vez más importantes de la co-creación y la arqueología colaborativa.

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