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Becoming a recovery-oriented practitioner

  • Glenn Roberts and Jed Boardman

Summary

Professional practice explicitly focused on supporting the recovery of those it serves is broadly backed by an emerging profile of necessary knowledge, key skills and innovative collaborations, although there is no universally accepted practice ‘model’. This article outlines these components and discusses the associated need for change in the culture of provider organisations along with implementation of wider social and economic policies to support peoples' recovery and social inclusion. This is a values-led approach supported by persuasive advocacy and international endorsement but still in need of further development, systematic evaluation and confirmatory evidence.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Glenn Roberts, Department of Research and Development, Devon Partnership NHS Trust Wonford House Hospital, Exeter EX2 5AF, UK. Email: glenn.roberts@nhs.net

Footnotes

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In the previous issue of Advances, Roberts & Boardman discussed the ideas, principles and definitions of recovery (Boardman 2013). For a commentary on both articles, see pp. 48–51, this issue.

Declaration of Interest

Both authors work part time with the Centre for Mental Health in support of the national Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change (ImROC) programme.

Footnotes

References

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Becoming a recovery-oriented practitioner

  • Glenn Roberts and Jed Boardman

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Becoming a recovery-oriented practitioner

  • Glenn Roberts and Jed Boardman
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