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Critical reflection: a sound foundation for learning and practice in psychiatry

  • Stavros Bekas
Summary

A genuinely critical and reflective approach to psychiatry can potentiate learning, improve practice and promote personal development. To support this assertion, I attempt to link theory and practice. Following a brief overview of the seminal ideas that permeate the literature on critical thinking, I present three perspectives of reflective practice – those of the psychiatric trainee, the teacher and the practitioner – through examples of reflective exploration of personal experience, under the light of relevant evidence. I conclude with a critique on the limitations of reflective psychiatry.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Stavros Bekas, London Deanery School of Psychiatry, Stewart House, 32 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DN, UK. Email: stavros.bekas@nhs.net.
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Declaration of Interest

None.

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References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 1355-5146
  • EISSN: 1472-1481
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
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Critical reflection: a sound foundation for learning and practice in psychiatry

  • Stavros Bekas
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