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Delivering psychiatric care to prisoners: problems and solutions

  • John Reed
Extract

‘In some few jails are confined idiots and lunatics, –many of the bridewells are crowded and offensive, because the rooms which were designed for prisoners are occupied by lunatics. The insane, when they are not kept separate, disturb and terrify other prisoners. No care is taken of them, although it is probable that by medicines, and proper regimen, some of them might be restored to their senses, and usefulness in life’ (Howard, 1784: pp. 10–11).

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References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 1355-5146
  • EISSN: 1472-1481
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
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Delivering psychiatric care to prisoners: problems and solutions

  • John Reed
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