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Excessive reassurance-seeking

  • David W. S. Osborne and Christopher J. Williams

Summary

Different forms of excessive reassurance-seeking safety behaviours are explored, along with reasons why these unhelpful responses occur across a range of mental health disorders. This short update covers the rationale for reducing and stopping these behaviours and offers interventions to help people understand and overcome the unhelpful impact that excessive reassurance-seeking can have on them and others.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Professor C. Williams, Academic Institute of Mental Health and Wellbeing, Administration Building, Gartnavel Royal Hospital, 1055 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0XH, UK. Email: chris.williams@glasgow.ac.uk

Footnotes

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Declaration of Interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Kobori, O, Salkovskis, PM (2013) Patterns of reassurance seeking and reassurance-related behaviours in OCD and anxiety disorders. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy 41: 123.
Parrish, CL, Radomsky, AS (2010) Why do people seek reassurance and check repeatedly? An investigation of factors involved in compulsive behaviour in OCD and depression. Journal of Anxiety Disorders 24: 211–22.
Rector, NA, Kamkar, K, Cassin, SE et al (2011) Assessing excessive reassurance seeking in the anxiety disorders. Journal of Anxiety Disorders 25: 911–7.
Salkovskis, PM (1985) Obsessive–compulsive problems: a cognitive– behavioural analysis. Behaviour Research and Therapy 23: 571–83.
Williams, CJ (2007) Why Does Everything Always Go Wrong?: And Other Bad Thoughts You Can Beat (2nd rev edn). Five Areas.
Williams, CJ (2012) Overcoming Anxiety, Stress and Panic (3rd edn). CFR Press/Taylor and Francis.

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Excessive reassurance-seeking

  • David W. S. Osborne and Christopher J. Williams

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Excessive reassurance-seeking

  • David W. S. Osborne and Christopher J. Williams
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