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Working with guilt and shame

  • Andrew Clark

Summary

This article describes the psychological experiences of guilt and shame. Although these affects have an important role in holding our communities together, they can also become extremely distressing and debilitating for individuals. As such, they are transdiagnostic problems which are frequently encountered in mental healthcare. The origin of these affects is considered from religious, cultural and psychological perspectives. The article then explores the clinical manifestations of guilt and shame. Finally, consideration is given to therapeutic options, including general approaches as well as specific psychological therapies.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Andrew Clark, Psychotherapy Service, Cedar House, Blackberry Hill Hospital, Manor Road, Fishponds, Bristol BS16 2EW, UK. Email: andrew.clark@awp.nhs.uk

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Declaration of Interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Working with guilt and shame

  • Andrew Clark

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Working with guilt and shame

  • Andrew Clark
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