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Lord Lugard: A Preliminary Evaluation

Abstract
Opening Paragraph

To give the first Lugard Memorial Lecture upon Lord Lugard himself is at once a task of great honour and of great difficulty. I need not explain to this audience why it is an honour: we know that we are here to recall the life and work of a great man, who was a creator of our Institute and for nearly nineteen years (1926-45) its Chairman. But the difficulty does need some explanation. I must attempt at least a preliminary evaluation of a life that was immense in the period of time covered and in the range, both in space and in character, of its activities. Yet I cannot assume that you have a full knowledge of that life since its story has yet to be told. Some here knew him in his later years; there are, indeed, some still alive who worked with him in the vigorous days of his prime. There is also his own vivid account of four of his most adventurous early years, and there is the impressive documentation of his governorships. But there are large areas in his youth and even in his manhood which are still quite unknown. And when these have been explored the parts have still to be put together to form a biographical whole. Here is my difficulty: I cannot, in the time we have this evening, attempt both to tell the story, even in outline, and to comment. Yet how can the story and the comment be divorced? I must attempt a compromise. I must offer you something not much more than a chronology of his life, and tell you a little—and how little it must be—of some of his earlier, less known achievements; and then, assuming your knowledge of his later life, offer, in all humility, my first provisional evaluation. I emphasize provisional because my biography is only half drafted and there is much, especially between his leaving Nigeria in 1906 and the latest part of his life when I knew him, that is still, for me, a subject for research.

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page 228 note 1 The Lugard Lecture was founded by the International African Institute in memory of its first Chairman. The lecture is given annually on the occasion of the meeting of the Institute's Executive Council. This paper, the first of the Lugard Lectures, was read by Miss Perham at the Indisch Instituut, Amsterdam, on 3 April 1950, on the occasion of the 24th Meeting of the Executive Council, and was repeated at a special joint meeting ofthe International African Institute, the Royal African Society and the Royal Empire Society in London on 20 April 1950.

page 228 note 2 The Rise of our East African Empire, 2 vols. London: Blackwood & Sons, 1893.

page 231 note 1 The Rise of our East African Empire.

page 236 note 1 The Dual Mandate in British Tropical Africa. London: Blackwood & Sons, 1922; 2nd edition 1929.

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Africa
  • ISSN: 0001-9720
  • EISSN: 1750-0184
  • URL: /core/journals/africa
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