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Modelling spatial reasoning systems with shape algebras and formal logic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 February 2009

Scott C. Chase
Affiliation:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Manufacturing Systems Integration Division, Gaithersburg, MD 20899–0001, USA

Abstract

The combination of the paradigms of shape algebras and predicate logic representations, used in a new method for describing designs, is presented. First-order predicate logic provides a natural, intuitive way of representing shapes and spatial relations in the development of complete computer systems for reasoning about designs. Shape algebraic formalisms have advantages over more traditional representations of geometric objects. Here we illustrate the definition of a large set of high-level design relations from a small set of simple structures and spatial relations, with examples from the domains of geographic information systems and architecture.

Type
Articles
Information
AI EDAM , Volume 11 , Issue 4 , September 1997 , pp. 273 - 285
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1997

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