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Article contents

Personalized diagnoses for inconsistent user requirements

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 April 2011

Alexander Felfernig
Affiliation:
Institute for Software Technology, Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria
Monika Schubert
Affiliation:
Institute for Software Technology, Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria

Abstract

Knowledge-based configurators are supporting configuration tasks for complex products such as telecommunication systems, computers, or financial services. Product configurations have to fulfill the requirements articulated by the user and the constraints contained in the configuration knowledge base. If the user requirements are inconsistent with the constraints in the configuration knowledge base, users have to be supported in finding out a way from the no solution could be found dilemma. In this paper we introduce a new algorithm (PersDiag) that allows the determination of personalized diagnoses for inconsistent user requirements in knowledge-based configuration scenarios. We present the results of an empirical study that show the advantages of our approach in terms of prediction quality and efficiency.

Type
Special Issue Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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