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Using genetic programming and decision trees for generating structural descriptions of four bar mechanisms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 February 2004

ANIKÓ EKÁRT
Affiliation:
Computer and Automation Research Institute, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary
ANDRÁS MÁRKUS
Affiliation:
Computer and Automation Research Institute, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

Abstract

Four bar mechanisms are basic components of many important mechanical devices. The kinematic synthesis of four bar mechanisms is a difficult design problem. A novel method that combines the genetic programming and decision tree learning methods is presented. We give a structural description for the class of mechanisms that produce desired coupler curves. Constructive induction is used to find and characterize feasible regions of the design space. Decision trees constitute the learning engine, and the new features are created by genetic programming.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2003 Cambridge University Press

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