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Special Issue: Configuration Design

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 1998

TIMOTHY DARR
Affiliation:
Trilogy Development Group, 6034 West Courtyard Drive, Austin, TX 78730, U.S.A.
MARK KLEIN
Affiliation:
Center for Coordination Science, MIT Sloan School of Management, One Amherst Street E40-169, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.
DEBORAH L. McGUINNESS
Affiliation:
AT&T Labs—Research, 180 Park Ave., Florham Park, NJ 07932, U.S.A.
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Abstract

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In configuration design parts are selected and connected to meet customer specifications and engineering and physical constraints. Specifications include preferences (e.g., “prefer lower cost to higher performance, all things being equal”), bounds on various resources (e.g., “the computer should have four PCI slots”), and other information to customize a configuration. Constraints typically arise from exogenous concerns, such as the available parts, the way parts can interact, and the manufacturing plant.

Type
GUEST EDITORIAL
Copyright
© 1998 Cambridge University Press