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The Architecture of International Migration Law: A Deconstructivist Design of Complexity and Contradiction

  • Vincent Chetail (a1)

Extract

International migration law (hereinafter IML) can be described and conceptualized as a deconstructivist architecture both literally and metaphorically. It is an architecture of fragmentation based on dissonance and asymmetry that questions the traditions of harmony, unity, and stability. Initiated by the French philosopher Jacques Derrida, the deconstructivist architectural movement distorts the conventional oppositions between form and function, center and margin, outside and inside.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

References

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1 Vincent Chetail, International Migration Law (2017).

2 Philip Johnson & Mark Wigley, Deconstructivist architecture (1988).

4 Id. at 910–911.

5 Id. at 914–914.

6 Vattel's International Law in a XXIst Century Perspective (Vincent Chetail & Peter Haggenmacher eds., 2011); Emmanuelle Jouannet, Emer de Vattel et l'émergence doctrinale du droit international public (1998).

7 Emer de Vattel, The Law of Nations 322 (1797).

8 See, also, James Nafziger, The General Admission of Aliens under International Law, 77 AJIL 811 (1983).

9 Ekiu v. U.S. 142 U.S. 651 (1892).

10 See notably, John Torpey, The Invention of the Passport: Surveillance, Citizenship and the State 111–121 (2000).

11 For further discussions, see Vincent Chetail, The Human Rights of Migrants in General International Law: From Minimum Standards to Fundamental Rights 28 Geo. Immigr. L.J. 225 (2013).

12 Philip C. Jessup, A Modern Law of Nations 94 (1948).

13 Louis Varlez, Les migrations internationales et leur réglementation, 20 Recueil des Cours 171 (1927).

14 Richard Plender, International Migration Law (2d ed., 1988).

15 Migration and International Legal Norms (T. Alexander Aleinikoff & Vincent Chetail eds., 2003); International Migration Law: Developing Paradigms and Key Challenges (Ryszard Cholewinski et al. eds., 2007); Globalization, Migration and Human Rights: International Law under Review (Vincent Chetail ed., 2007); Foundations of International Migration Law (Brian Opeskin et al. eds., 2012); Research Handbook on International Law and Migration (Vincent Chetail & Céline Bauloz eds., 2014); Issues in International Migration Law (Richard Plender ed., 2015).

16 T. Alexander Aleinikoff, International Legal Norms on Migration: Substance without Architecture, International Migration Law: Developing Paradigms and Key Challenges 479 n. 9.

18 For further discussions, see Vincent Chetail, The Transnational Movement of Persons Under General International Law - Mapping the Customary Law Foundations of International Migration Law, in Research Handbook on International Law and Migration, supra note 15, at 1.

19 See, for instance, Vincent Chetail, Conceptualizing International Migration Law, 110 ASIL. Proc. (2017); Jaya Ramji-Nogales, Migration Emergencies, 68 Hastings L.J. 118 (2017); Chantal Thomas, What does the emerging international law of migration mean for sovereignty?, 14 Melbourne J. Int'l L. 1 (2013).

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  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2398-7723
  • URL: /core/journals/american-journal-of-international-law
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