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The Concept of an International Institutional Bypass

  • Mariana Mota Prado (a1) and Steven J. Hoffman (a2)
Abstract

The rapid proliferation of international institutions has been a defining feature of the postwar international architecture. Since the end of the Second World War, the international system has seen the creation of thousands of international treaties and organizations that have established rules governing a multitude of issues that range from international security to human rights, and from international trade to the environment.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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1 For a definition of “regime,” see Stephen D. Krasner, Structural Causes and Regime Consequences: Regimes as Intervening Variables, 36 Int'l Org. 185, 186 (1982) (defining it as “[i]mplicit or explicit principles, norms, rules and decision-making procedures around which actors’ expectations converge in a given area of international relations”).

2 Kal Raustiala & David G. Victor, The Regime Complex for Plant Genetic Resources, 58 Int'l Org. 277, 279 (2004).

3 Karen J. Alter & Sophie Meunier, The Politics of International Regime Complexity, 7 Persp. Pol. 13, 16 (2009).

4 See Raustiala & Victor, supra note 2, at 299–300.

5 We are grateful to Patricia Galvão Ferreira for this suggestion.

6 Robert O. Keohane & David G. Victor, The Regime Complex for Climate Change, 9 Persp. Pol. 7, 16 (2011).

7 Id. at 15.

8 Joseph Jupille & Duncan Snidal, International Institutional Choice: Cooperation, Alternatives and Strategies, in Institutional Choice and Global Commerce 19, 19 (Joseph Jupille et al. eds., 2013).

9 Alter & Meunier, supra note 3, at 16.

10 Id. at 16–17.

11 Daniel W. Drezner, The Tragedy of the Global Institutional Commons, in Back to Basics: State Power in a Contemporary World 280, 281 (Martha Finnemore & Judith Goldstein eds., 2013).

This work was completed as part of the International Collaboration for Capitalizing on Cost-Effective and Life-Saving Commodities (i4C) that is funded through the Research Council of Norway's Global Health & Vaccination Programme (GLOBVAC Project #234608).

Author's name has been corrected since original publication. Funding information has also been added since original publication. See 10.1017/aju.2017.78

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  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2398-7723
  • URL: /core/journals/american-journal-of-international-law
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