Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Toward a Global System of Human Mobility: Three Thoughts

  • T. Alexander Aleinikoff (a1)
Extract

Migration is already a significant global phenomenon, and it is likely to become more so. According to a recent World Bank report, there are two hundred million international migrants. The study reports that “migration pressures” will continue “for the foreseeable future.” It will take “decades” to close income gaps between developed and developing countries; in 2015, the ratio between the average income of the high-income countries and that of the low-income countries stood at 70:1. A “well-documented demographic divergence” will add further pressure: “Population aging will produce large labor-market imbalances and fiscal pressures in high-income countries as the tax base narrows and the cost of caring for the old surges.” This increase in demand will complement an increase in supply. “If current fertility and national employment rates remain as they are in the developing world,” the Bank reports, by 2050 “nearly 900 million [will be] in search of work.” Climate change and disasters will have a more modest impact on the international level, although “increased drought and desertification, rising sea levels, repeated crop failures, and more intense and frequent storms are likely to increase internal migration.” And these numbers—measuring persons outside their home country for more than a year—do not include hundreds of millions of persons who cross international borders for shorter periods of time: tourists, students, temporary workers, business persons, asylum-seekers.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Toward a Global System of Human Mobility: Three Thoughts
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Toward a Global System of Human Mobility: Three Thoughts
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Toward a Global System of Human Mobility: Three Thoughts
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All

2 Migrants as a proportion of the world's population stood at 3.3% in 2015, up from 2.8% in 2010. See United Nations Dep't of Economic and Social Affairs, International Migration Report 2015, at 21 (2016).

3 U.S. immigration detention policies, for example, are vulnerable under prevailing international human rights standards, were those standards ever to be applied. See, e.g., Amnesty International, Jailed Without Justice: Immigrant Detention in the USA (2008).

4 The decline and probable fall of the Schengen system may mean that EU citizens will now need to show passports when crossing borders within the Schengen zone but nothing (yet) suggests that the fundamental norm of freedom of movement within the European Union is at risk.

5 As well as nonmobility—i.e., removing causes that force people to move who would prefer to stay home.

6 See GA, New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, UN Doc. A/71/L.1 (Sept. 13, 2016).

7 See id. at para. 21 and ann. 2.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

AJIL Unbound
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2398-7723
  • URL: /core/journals/american-journal-of-international-law
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 84
Total number of PDF views: 392 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 536 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 10th April 2017 - 23rd May 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.