Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-bjz6k Total loading time: 0.401 Render date: 2022-05-18T12:33:47.822Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Brucella: functional genomics and host–pathogen interactions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2007

Gireesh Rajashekara
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, 1656 Linden Dr., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
Linda Eskra
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, 1656 Linden Dr., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
Angie Mathison
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, 1656 Linden Dr., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
Erik Petersen
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, 1656 Linden Dr., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
Qiqi Yu
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, 1656 Linden Dr., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
Jerome Harms
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, 1656 Linden Dr., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
Gary Splitter
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, 1656 Linden Dr., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA

Abstract

Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease caused by a number of Brucella species and is characterized by chronic macrophage infection. However, genes that may contribute to intracellular survival of the Brucella species are not well studied. This review presents, first, genomic islands that are present or absent in various Brucella species that may help establish Brucella infection and survival strategies. Second, the alteration in macrophage transcription by Brucella to permit its long-term survival within this hostile intracellular environment. A large number of macrophage gene transcripts are altered following Brucella infection indicating that Brucella is not a silent invader of host cells. Macrophage transcript levels associated with inflammation, apoptosis, signal transduction and vesicular intracellular trafficking are altered during Brucella infection, and likely contribute to intracellular survival of Brucella. Lastly, the host–pathogen interaction events associated with Brucella infection in living mice visualized in real-time using biophotonic imaging. Mice are often used to evaluate Brucella infections; however, Brucella dissemination and pathogenesis is poorly understood in mice. Biophotonic imaging of Brucella infections revealed sites of bacterial localization similar to human infections and different patterns of infection by attenuated or virulent Brucella.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
18
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Brucella: functional genomics and host–pathogen interactions
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Brucella: functional genomics and host–pathogen interactions
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Brucella: functional genomics and host–pathogen interactions
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *