Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-xb65s Total loading time: 0.179 Render date: 2022-01-24T07:09:37.365Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Appearance of immunoglobulin G in the plasma of piglets following intake of colostrum, with or without a delay in sucking

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 August 2016

I.M. Bland
Affiliation:
Sustainable Livestock Systems, Scottish Agricultural College, Craibstone Estate, Aberdeen AB21 9YA, UK
J.A. Rooke*
Affiliation:
Sustainable Livestock Systems, Scottish Agricultural College, Craibstone Estate, Aberdeen AB21 9YA, UK
V.C. Bland
Affiliation:
Sustainable Livestock Systems, Scottish Agricultural College, Craibstone Estate, Aberdeen AB21 9YA, UK
A.G. Sinclair
Affiliation:
Sustainable Livestock Systems, Scottish Agricultural College, Craibstone Estate, Aberdeen AB21 9YA, UK
S.A. Edwards
Affiliation:
Sustainable Livestock Systems, Scottish Agricultural College, Craibstone Estate, Aberdeen AB21 9YA, UK
*
Corresponding author. E-mail: j.rooke@ab.sac.ac.uk
Get access

Abstract

The intake of immunoglobulin G (IgG) by sucking piglets from colostrum was estimated over the first 24 h of sucking by the weigh-suck-weigh technique using experimentally determined correction factors for metabolic and urinary losses and was related to appearance of IgG in piglet plasma. Colostrum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentrations declined rapidly from 61 mg/ml at the start of sucking to 9·0 mg/ml after 24 h sucking. IgG was first detected in piglet plasma after 4 h sucking, increased to a maximum after 12 to 16 h sucking and thereafter declined. In piglets allowed to suck from birth, there was no significant relationship between estimated IgG intake and plasma IgG concentration suggesting that IgG intake did not limit acquisition of IgG by the piglet. When sucking was delayed by 8 or 12 h, colostrum intakes by piglets were not different from piglets allowed immediate access to the udder but IgG intakes were significantly (P < 0·001) decreased. Total plasma IgG (g/kg live weight) did not decline significantly as a result of delayed sucking. In conclusion, under the experimental conditions employed, the appearance of IgG in piglet plasma was limited by factors other than by colostrum IgG intake.

Type
Non-ruminant nutrition, behaviour and production
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Blaxter, K. L. 1989. Energy metabolism in animals and man. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
Bradford, M. M. 1976. A rapid and sensitive method for the quantitation of microgram quantities of protein utilizing the principle of protein-dye binding. Analytical Biochemistry 72: 248254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brooks, P. H. and Burke, J. 1998. Behaviour of sows and piglets during lactation. In The lactating sow (ed. Verstegen, M.W.A., Moughan, P.J. and Schrama, J. W.), pp. 301338. Wageningen Pers, Wageningen.Google Scholar
Burton, K. A. and Smith, M. W. 1977. Endocytosis and immunoglobulin transport across the small intestine of the new-born piglet. Journal of Physiology 270: 473488.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlsson, L. C. T., Westrom, B. R. and Karlsson, B. W. 1980. Intestinal absorption of proteins by the neonatal piglet fed on sow’s colostrum with either natural or experimentally eliminated trypsin-inhibiting activity. Biology of the Neonate 38: 309320.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarke, R. M. and Hardy, R. N. 1971. Histological changes in the small intestine of the young pig and their relation to macromolecular uptake. Journal of Anatomy 108: 6377.Google Scholar
Donovan, S. M., Chao, J. C. J., Zijlstra, R. T. and Odle, J. 1997. Orally administered iodinated recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I (I-125-rhIGF-I) is poorly absorbed by the newborn piglet. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 24: 174182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ekstrom, G. M. and Westrom, B. K. 1991. Cathepsin B and D activities in intestinal mucosa during postnatal development in pigs. Relation to intestinal uptake and transmission of macromolecules. Biology of the Neonate 59: 314321.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fraser, D. and Rushen, J. 1992. Colostrum intake by newborn piglets. Canadian Journal of Animal Science 72: 113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallagher, D. P., Cotter, P. F. and Mulvihill, D. M. 1997. Porcine milk proteins: a review. International Dairy Journal 7: 99118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gaskins, H. R. and Kelley, K. W. 1995. Immunology and neonatal mortality. In The neonatal pig development and survival (ed. Varley, M. A.), pp. 3958. CAB International, Wallingford.Google Scholar
Harada, E., Sugiyama, A., Takeuchi, T., Sitizyo, K., Syuto, B., Yajima, T. and Kuwata, T. 1999. Characteristic transfer of colostral components into cerebrospinal fluid via serum in neonatal pigs. Biology of the Neonate 76: 3343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Herpin, P., Le Dividich, J., Berthon, D. and Hulin, J. -C. 1994. Assessment of thermoregulatory and postprandial thermogenesis over the first 24 hours after birth in pigs. Experimental Physiology 79: 10111019.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Herpin, P., Le Dividich, J. and Os, M. van. 1992. Contribution of colostral fat to thermogenesis and glucose homeostasis in the newborn pig. Journal of Developmental Physiology 17: 133141.Google Scholar
Kiriyama, H. 1992. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of colostral IgG transported into lymph and plasma in neonatal pigs. American Journal of Physiology 263: R976R980.Google Scholar
Klaver, J., Vankempen, G. J. M., Delange, P. G. B., Verstegen, M. W. A. and Boer, H. 1981. Milk-composition and daily yield of different milk components as affected by sow condition and lactation-feeding regimen. Journal of Animal Science 52: 10911097.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Klobasa, F. and Butler, L. E. 1987. Absolute and relative concentrations of immunoglobulins G, M and A, and albumin in the lacteal secretions of sows of different lactation numbers. American Journal of Veterinary Research 48: 176182.Google Scholar
Klobasa, F., Werhahn, E. and Butler, L. E. 1981. Regulation of humoral immunity in the piglet by immunoglobulins of maternal origin. Research in Veterinary Science 31: 195206.Google Scholar
Krakowski, L., Krzyzanowski, J., Wrona, Z., Kostro, K. and Siwicki, A. K. 2002. The influence of nonspecific immunostimulation or pregnant sows on the immunological value of colostrum. Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology 87: 8995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Laemmli, U. K. 1970. Cleavage of structural proteins during the assembly of the head of bacteriophage T4. Nature 227: 680687.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lawes Agricultural Trust. 1987. Genstat 5 reference manual. Clarendon Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
Lecce, J. G. 1966. Glucose milliequivalents eaten by the neonatal pig and cessation of intestinal absorption of large molecules (closure). Journal of Nutrition 90: 240244.Google Scholar
Lecce, J. G. and Morgan, D. O. 1962. Effect of dietary regimen on cessation of intestinal absorption of large molecules (closure) in the neonatal pig and lamb. Journal of Nutrition 78: 263268.Google Scholar
Le Dividich, J., Esnault, T. H., Lynch, B., Hoo-Paris, R., Castex, C. H. and Peiniau, J. 1991. Effect of colostral fat level on fat deposition and plasma metabolites in the newborn pig. Journal of Animal Science 69: 24802488.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Le Dividich, J., Herpin, P., Paul, E. and Strullu, F. 1997. Effect of fat content of colostrum on voluntary consumption and fat utilization in newborn pigs. Journal of Animal Science 75: 707713.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Le Dividich, J. and Noblet, J. 1981. Colostrum intake and thermoregulation in the neonatal pig in relation to environmental temperature. Biology of the Neonate 40: 167174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCance, R. A. and Widdowson, E. M. 1959. The effect of colostrum on the composition and volume of the plasma of newborn piglets. Journal of Physiology 145: 547550.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Passille, A.-M. B. de, Rushen, J. and Pelletier, G. 1988. Sucking behaviour and serum immunoglobulin levels in neonatal piglets. Animal Production 47: 447456.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pierce, A. E. and Smith, M. W. 1967. The intestinal absorption of pig and bovine immune lactoglobulin and human serum albumin by the new-born pig. Journal of Physiology 190: 118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prieto, L., Prathalingam, N. S., Tarongi, A., Davidson, F. M., English, P. R., Rooke, J. A., Ewen, M. and Edwards, S. A. 1999. The effect of parity, litter size and sow body reserves on Ig content of colostrum. Proceedings of the British Society of Animal Science, 1999, p. 188 (abstr.).Google Scholar
Ramirez, C. G., Miller, E. R., Ullrey, D. E. and Hoefer, J. A. 1962. Swine hematology from birth to maturity. III. Blood volume of the nursing pig. Journal of Animal Science 21: 10681074.Google Scholar
Rudolph, B. C., Stahly, T. S. and Cromwell, G. L. 1984. Accuracy of milk intake in pigs by water turnover (via D2O dilution) and weigh-suckle method. Journal of Animal Science 59: (suppl. 1) 101.Google Scholar
Sangild, P. T., Fowden, A. L. and Trahair, J. F. 2000. How does the foetal gastrointestinal tract develop in preparation for enteral nutrition after birth? Livestock Production Science 66: 141150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sangild, P. T., Holtug, K., Diernæs, L., Schmidt, M. and Skadhauge, E. 1997. Birth and prematurity influence intestinal function in the newborn pig. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology 118A: 359361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Svendsen, L. S., Westrom, B. R., Svendsen, J., Olsson, A. C. -H. and Karlsson, B. W. 1990. Intestinal macromolecular transmission in underprivileged and unaffected newborn piglets: implication for survival of underprivileged piglets. Research in Veterinary Science 48: 184189.Google Scholar
Svendsen, J., Wilson, M. R. and Ewert, E. 1972. Serum protein levels in pigs from birth to maturity and in young pigs with and without enterocolibacillosis. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 13: 528538.Google Scholar
Talbot, R. B. and Swenson, M. J. 1970. Blood volume of pigs from birth through 6 weeks of age. American Journal of Physiology 218: 11411144.Google ScholarPubMed
Varley, M. A., Rucklidge, G. J., Wilkinson, R. J. and Maitland, A. 1985. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of immunoglobulin G concentrations in porcine plasma and colostrum. Research in Veterinary Science 38: 279281.Google Scholar
Vellenga, L., Wensing, T. and Breukink, H. J. 1988. Effect of feeding 5 per cent glucose solution or milk replacer on intestinal permeability to macromolecules. Veterinary Record 123: 395397.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Werhahn, E., Klobasa, F. and Butler, J. E. 1981. Investigation of some factors which influence the absorption of IgG by the neonatal piglet. Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology 2: 3551.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Westrom, B., Svendsen, J. and Tagesson, C. 1984. Intestinal permeability to polyethyleneglycol 600 in relation to macromolecular ‘closure’ in the neonatal pig. Gut 25: 520525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weström, B. R., Ohlsson, B. G., Svendsen, J., Tagesson, C. and Karlsson, B. W. 1985 Intestinal transmission of macromolecules (BSA and FITC-labelled dextran) in the neonatal pig: the effect of colostrum, proteins and proteinase inhibitors. Biology of the Neonate 47: 359366.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Xu, R. J., Wang, F. and Zhang, S. H. 2000. Postnatal adaptation of the gastrointestinal tract in neonatal pigs: a possible role of milk-borne growth factors. Livestock Production Science 66: 95107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Appearance of immunoglobulin G in the plasma of piglets following intake of colostrum, with or without a delay in sucking
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Appearance of immunoglobulin G in the plasma of piglets following intake of colostrum, with or without a delay in sucking
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Appearance of immunoglobulin G in the plasma of piglets following intake of colostrum, with or without a delay in sucking
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *