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The effect of dietary inclusion of yeast culture (Yea-Sacc) on patterns of rumen fermentation, food intake and growth of intensively fed bulls

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

T. Mutsvangwa
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture, 581 King Street, Aberdeen AB9 1UD
I. E. Edwards
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture, 581 King Street, Aberdeen AB9 1UD
J. H. Topps
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture, 581 King Street, Aberdeen AB9 1UD
G. F. M. Paterson
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture, 581 King Street, Aberdeen AB9 1UD
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Abstract

The effects of a barley beef diet without (control) and with a yeast culture (YC) on rumen fermentation, in vivo diet digestibility, nitrogen retention, live-weight gain and food intake were evaluated using 13 Limousin × British Friesian bulls per treatment. The YC was composed of the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its growth medium dried in such a manner that it maintained its fermentative capacity. The addition of YC significantly increased the concentration of acetate (P < 0·05) while propionate concentration tended to be higher for bulls given YC (P > 0·05). The acetate: propionate ratio remained unchanged. Concentration of total volatile fatty acid (VFA) was significantly higher in YC bulls compared with control bulls (P < 0·05). The in vitro studies using the Menke gas test confirmed these findings. Mean in vitro gas production in bulls receiving YC was lower than that in the controls (P < 0·05) and methane production was significantly reduced by the addition of YC after 12h (P < 0·01). Ruminal ammonia concentrations were not affected by treatment but ruminal pH was significantly depressed by the addition of YC (P < 0·05).

Apparent digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein and neutral-detergent fibre were unaffected by treatment but tended to be higher with the control diet. Nitrogen retention was not affected by the addition of YC and mean values for allantoin excretion and plasma urea were similar.

In a 28-week feeding trial, dry-matter intake was significantly greater for bulls given YC (5·55 kg/day) than for control bulls (5·32 kg/day, P < 0·05) but average daily gain, 1·55 and 1·58 kg/day for control and YC respectively, and food conversion efficiency were not improved significantly by YC (P > 0·05).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1992

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