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A note on the genetic variation in the fatty acid composition of cow milk

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

R. A. Edwards
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Biochemistry, School of Agriculture, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh EH9 3JG and ARC Animal Breeding Research Organisation, Edinburgh EH9 3JQ
J. W. B. King
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Biochemistry, School of Agriculture, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh EH9 3JG and ARC Animal Breeding Research Organisation, Edinburgh EH9 3JQ
I. M. Yousef
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Biochemistry, School of Agriculture, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh EH9 3JG and ARC Animal Breeding Research Organisation, Edinburgh EH9 3JQ
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Summary

The fatty acid composition of milk samples from Ayrshire twin cows was determined. The results were in general agreement with those reported by other workers. Comparisons between the variation within pairs of one and two-egg twins showed that the proportions of different fatty acids are subject to a high degree of genetic control.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1973

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References

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