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Definitive specimens of Merlucciidae (Gadiformes) from the Eocene James Ross Basin of Isla Marambio (Seymour Island), Antarctic Peninsula

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2012

Kerin M. Claeson*
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Athens OH, USA
Joseph T. Eastman
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Athens OH, USA
Ross D. E. Macphee
Affiliation:
Division of Vertebrate Zoology, American Museum of Natural History, New York NY, USA

Abstract

An isolated partial right dentary (BAS D.515.2) collected by the British Antarctic Survey prompted a re-evaluation of gadiform remains from the La Meseta Formation (conventionally middle Eocene) of Isla Marambio (Seymour Island), Antarctic Peninsula. Modern gadiforms (hakes and cods) range from the Arctic to Antarctic, inhabiting deep sea benthic, shore, estuarine, and freshwater environments. Based on a fossil record primarily composed of otoliths, they are known to extend back to the Eocene and Oligocene. The new specimen was recovered from the fossil penguin locality D.515. It is characterized by a single row of sharp, ankylosed teeth set upon robust bony pedestals. The surface anterior to the mental foramen exhibits ascending and descending ridges with slightly rugose texture. The ascending ridge is fractured, but partially covers the lateral aspect of the tooth row. BAS D.515.2 is unlike the dentary of macrourid gadiforms, also recovered from the Eocene of Antarctica. BAS D.515.2 preserves several features similar to previously published accounts of the gadiform “†Mesetaichthys” from Isla Marambio. These specimens are probably the same taxon and their combined character suite indicates it is a member of Merluccidae. Thus, these are the only non-otolithic skeletal specimens of an Eocene hake known outside of the London Clay's †Rhinocephalus.

Type
Earth Sciences
Copyright
Copyright © Antarctic Science Ltd 2012

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Definitive specimens of Merlucciidae (Gadiformes) from the Eocene James Ross Basin of Isla Marambio (Seymour Island), Antarctic Peninsula
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Definitive specimens of Merlucciidae (Gadiformes) from the Eocene James Ross Basin of Isla Marambio (Seymour Island), Antarctic Peninsula
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Definitive specimens of Merlucciidae (Gadiformes) from the Eocene James Ross Basin of Isla Marambio (Seymour Island), Antarctic Peninsula
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