Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-8hm5d Total loading time: 0.382 Render date: 2022-05-19T22:02:04.318Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Article contents

Hydrocarbon degradation by Antarctic coastal bacteria

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 May 2004

J. E. Cavanagh
Affiliation:
Australian Collection of Antarctic Microorganisms, Antarctic Co-operative Research Centre, University of Tasmania, PO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia CSIRO Division of Marine Research, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7000, Australia Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, PO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville, QLD 4810, Australia
P. D. Nichols
Affiliation:
Australian Collection of Antarctic Microorganisms, Antarctic Co-operative Research Centre, University of Tasmania, PO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia CSIRO Division of Marine Research, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7000, Australia
P. D. Franzmann
Affiliation:
CSIRO Land and Water, Private Bag PO Wembley, WA 6014, Australia
T. A. Mcmeekin
Affiliation:
Australian Collection of Antarctic Microorganisms, Antarctic Co-operative Research Centre, University of Tasmania, PO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, PO Box 252C, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia

Abstract

Bacterial cultures obtained through selective enrichment of beach sand collected 60 days and one year after treatment of sites in a pilot oil spill trial conducted at Airport Beach, Vestfold Hills, East Antarctica, were examined for the ability to degrade n-alkanes and phenanthrene. The effects of different hydrocarbon mixtures (Special Antarctic Blend [SAB] and BP-Visco), fish oil [orange roughy]) and inoculation of replicate sites with water from Organic Lake (previously shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria) on the indigenous microbial population were examined. Of the cultures obtained, those from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco degraded n-alkanes most consistently and typically to the greatest extent. Two mixed cultures obtained from samples collected at 60 days and two isolates obtained from these cultures extensively degraded phenanthrene. 1-Hydroxy-naphthoic acid formed the major phenanthrene metabolite. Lower levels of salicylic acid, 1-naphthol, 1, 4-naphthaquinone and phenanthrene 9-10 dihydrodiol were detected in extracts of phenanthrene grown cultures. This study shows that under laboratory conditions indigenous Antarctic bacteria can degrade n-alkanes and the more recalcitrant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, phenanthrene. The enrichment of hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms in Antarctic ecosystems exposed to hydrocarbons is relevant for the long term fate hydrocarbon spills in this environment.

Type
Papers—Life Sciences and Oceanography
Copyright
© Antarctic Science Ltd 1998

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
17
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Hydrocarbon degradation by Antarctic coastal bacteria
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Hydrocarbon degradation by Antarctic coastal bacteria
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Hydrocarbon degradation by Antarctic coastal bacteria
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *