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Low-temperature investigation of residual water bound in free-living Antarctic Prasiola crispa

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2022

Magdalena Bacior*
Affiliation:
Department of Soil Science and Agrophysics, University of Agriculture in Kraków, Al. Mickiewicza 21, 31-120 Kraków, Poland
Hubert Harańczyk
Affiliation:
Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Prof. Stanisława Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków, Poland
Piotr Nowak
Affiliation:
Faculty of Computer Science, Electronics and Telecommunications, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków, Poland
Paulina Kijak
Affiliation:
Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Prof. Stanisława Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków, Poland
Monika Marzec
Affiliation:
Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Prof. Stanisława Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków, Poland
Jakub Fitas
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Agrophysics, University of Agriculture in Kraków, Al. Mickiewicza 21, 31-120 Kraków, Poland
Maria Olech
Affiliation:
Institute of Botany, Jagiellonian University, ul. Kopernika 27, 31-501 Kraków, Poland Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Pawińskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland

Abstract

Antarctic algae are extremophilic organisms capable of surviving harsh environmental conditions such as low temperatures and deep dehydration. Although these algae have various adaptations for life in extreme environments, the majority of the molecular mechanisms behind their resistance to dehydration and freezing are not yet fully understood. The aim of our research was to observe the behaviour of bound water freezing in the free-living Antarctic alga Prasiola crispa. One way to avoid frost damage involves deep dehydration of the algal thallus. For that reason, a detailed analysis of water freezing at different sample hydration levels was carried out. Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation revealed two types of water immobilization: cooperative bound water freezing for samples with sample hydration levels above Δm/m0 = 0.40 and non-cooperative bound water immobilization for lower thallus hydration levels. In the differential scanning calorimetry experiment, 2-h incubation at -20°C suggested the diffusion and final binding of supercooled water to the ice nuclei and a lower hydration level threshold, at which ice formation could be observed (Δm/m0 = 0.21). Our research provides a new perspective on water sorption and freezing in Antarctic algae, which may be important not only in biological systems, but also in such novel materials as metal-organic frameworks or covalent organic frameworks.

Type
Physical Sciences
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Antarctic Science Ltd

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