Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 15
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Gelfo, Javier N. 2016. Considerations about the Evolutionary Stasis ofNotiolofos arquinotiensis(Mammalia: Sparnotheriodontidae), Eocene of Seymour Island, Antarctica. Ameghiniana, Vol. 53, Issue. 3, p. 316.


    Reguero, Marcelo A. Gelfo, Javier N. López, Guillermo M. Bond, Mariano Abello, Alejandra Santillana, Sergio N. and Marenssi, Sergio A. 2014. Final Gondwana breakup: The Paleogene South American native ungulates and the demise of the South America–Antarctica land connection. Global and Planetary Change, Vol. 123, p. 400.


    Acosta Hospitaleche, Carolina Reguero, Marcelo and Scarano, Alejo 2013. Main pathways in the evolution of the Paleogene Antarctic Sphenisciformes. Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 43, p. 101.


    Bond, Mariano Kramarz, Alejandro Macphee, Ross D. E. and Reguero, Marcelo 2011. A New Astrapothere (Mammalia, Meridiungulata) from La Meseta Formation, Seymour (Marambio) Island, and a Reassessment of Previous Records of Antarctic Astrapotheres. American Museum Novitates, Vol. 3718, Issue. 3718, p. 1.


    Springer, M. S. Meredith, R. W. Janecka, J. E. and Murphy, W. J. 2011. The historical biogeography of Mammalia. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 366, Issue. 1577, p. 2478.


    Truswell, E. M. and Macphail, M. K. 2009. Polar forests on the edge of extinction: what does the fossil spore and pollen evidence from East Antarctica say?. Australian Systematic Botany, Vol. 22, Issue. 2, p. 57.


    MacPhee, R.D.E. 2005. ‘First’ appearances in the Cenozoic land-mammal record of the Greater Antilles: significance and comparison with South American and Antarctic records. Journal of Biogeography, Vol. 32, Issue. 4, p. 551.


    Reguero, Marcelo A. Marenssi, Sergio A. and Santillana, Sergio N. 2002. Antarctic Peninsula and South America (Patagonia) Paleogene terrestrial faunas and environments: biogeographic relationships. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, Vol. 179, Issue. 3-4, p. 189.


    Dzik, Jerzy and Gaździcki, Andrzej 2001. The Eocene expansion of nautilids to high latitudes. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, Vol. 172, Issue. 3-4, p. 297.


    Jones, Craig M. 2000. Paleobiology and Paleoenvironments of Eocene Rocks: McMurdo Sound, East Antarctica.


    Wroe, Stephen Ebach, Malte Ahyong, Shane Muizon, Christian de and Muirhead, Jeanette 2000. CLADISTIC ANALYSIS OF DASYUROMORPHIAN (MARSUPIALIA) PHYLOGENY USING CRANIAL AND DENTAL CHARACTERS. Journal of Mammalogy, Vol. 81, Issue. 4, p. 1008.


    Flynn, John J. and Wyss, André R. 1999. New marsupials from the Eocene-Oligocene transition of the Andean Main Range, Chile. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol. 19, Issue. 3, p. 533.


    Houle, Alain 1999. The origin of platyrrhines: An evaluation of the Antarctic scenario and the floating island model. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 109, Issue. 4, p. 541.


    Yanbin, Shen 1998. A paleoisthmus linking southern South America with the Antarctic Peninsula during Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary. Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences, Vol. 41, Issue. 3, p. 225.


    Pole, Mike S. and Macphail, Mike K. 1996. Eocene Nypa from Regatta Point, Tasmania. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Vol. 92, Issue. 1-2, p. 55.


    ×

Eocene land mammals from Seymour Island, Antarctica: palaeobiogeographical implications

  • S. A. Marenssi (a1), M. A. Reguero (a2), S. N. Santillana (a1) and S. F. Vizcaino (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954102094000027
  • Published online: 01 May 2004
Abstract

Middle Eocene land mammals from La Meseta Formation, Seymour (Marambio) Island are reviewed. A taxonomically diverse fossil land-vertebrate assemblage with small and medium-size mammals has been recovered from four localities. The depositional setting is shallow marine and most of the mammal-bearing beds are in reworked, moderate to high energy subtidal facies. The characteristics of these mammals not only confirm but also strengthen the biogeographical relationships between southern South America (Patagonian Province) and the Antarctic Peninsula during the Paleogene and rule out the possibility of a major barrier between these areas. The Antarctic ungulates (Astrapotheria and ?Litopterna) are plesiomorphics in retaining low crowned cheek teeth and are more similar to those from the Pancasamayoran local faunas of southern South America (Patagonia).

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Eocene land mammals from Seymour Island, Antarctica: palaeobiogeographical implications
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Eocene land mammals from Seymour Island, Antarctica: palaeobiogeographical implications
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Eocene land mammals from Seymour Island, Antarctica: palaeobiogeographical implications
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Antarctic Science
  • ISSN: 0954-1020
  • EISSN: 1365-2079
  • URL: /core/journals/antarctic-science
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: