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    Mansilla, Héctor G. De Valais, Silvina Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang Varela, Natalia A. and Leppe, Marcelo A. 2012. New Avian tracks from the lower to middle Eocene at Fossil Hill, King George Island, Antarctica. Antarctic Science, Vol. 24, Issue. 05, p. 500.


    Williams, Mark Nelson, Anna E. Smellie, John L. Leng, Melanie J. Johnson, Andrew L.A. Jarram, Daniel R. Haywood, Alan M. Peck, Victoria L. Zalasiewicz, Jan Bennett, Carys and Schöne, Bernd R. 2010. Sea ice extent and seasonality for the Early Pliocene northern Weddell Sea. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, Vol. 292, Issue. 1-2, p. 306.


    Nelson, Anna E. Smellie, John L. Hambrey, Michael J. Williams, Mark Vautravers, Maryline Salzmann, Ulrich McArthur, John M. and Regelous, Marcel 2009. Neogene glacigenic debris flows on James Ross Island, northern Antarctic Peninsula, and their implications for regional climate history. Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol. 28, Issue. 27-28, p. 3138.


    Smellie, John L. Haywood, Alan M. Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter Lunt, Daniel J. and Valdes, Paul J. 2009. Nature of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet during the Pliocene: Geological evidence and modelling results compared. Earth-Science Reviews, Vol. 94, Issue. 1-4, p. 79.


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Short Note: Late Miocene marine trace fossils from James Ross Island

  • Anna E. Nelson (a1), John L. Smellie (a1), Mark Williams (a2) and Jan Zalasiewicz (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954102008001429
  • Published online: 01 June 2008
Abstract

Williams et al. (2006) reported asterozoans preserved in Late Miocene volcanic tuffs of the James Ross Island Volcanic Group. The material, from the north-west of James Ross Island at 64°01.9′S 58°20.07′W, was sourced from the newly named Asterozoan Buttress locality, and represented reconnaissance collecting. The volcaniclastic sediments in which the fossils are found are fine- to medium-grained volcanic sandstones with planar, laterally continuous beds 0.5–8 cm thick containing decimetre-scale ripple cross-lamination. In the absence of part and counterpart rock slabs, Williams et al. (2006) hypothesised that the fossils represented the external moulds of starfish or brittlestars pinioned by rapid sedimentation of volcanic tuffs. They noted that these tuffs represented a potential untapped source of fossil material for interpreting Neogene marine shelf environments on the northern Antarctic Peninsula. New fossil material collected at Asterozoan Buttress in February 2007 (by Anna Nelson) includes part and counterpart rock slabs, and demonstrates that the asterozoans are resting traces of animals, referable to the ichnogenus Asteriacites, and not external moulds of entombed animals (Fig. 1a & d). We reinterpret the ‘detached’ arm and ‘current-entrainment’ specimens of Williams et al. (2006, fig. 5c & d) as representing a possible scull mark and movement of the asterozoan across the sediment surface respectively (see Bell 2004, text-fig. 11 for comparison).

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*aene@bas.ac.uk
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C.M. Bell 2004. Asteroid and ophiuroid trace fossils from the Lower Cretaceous of Chile. Palaeontology, 47, 5166.

A. Brandt , A.J. Gooday , S.N. Brandão , S. Brix , W. Brökeland , T. Cedhagen , M. Choudhury , N. Cornelius , B. Danis , I. De Mesel , R.J. Diaz , D.C. Gillan , B. Ebbe , J.A. Howe , D. Janussen , S. Kaiser , K. Linse , M. Malyutina , J. Pawlowski , M. Raupach & A. Vanreusel 2007. First insights into the biodiversity and biogeography of the Southern Ocean deep sea. Nature, 447, 307311.

R.W. Frey & A. Seilacher 1980. Uniformity in marine invertebrate ichnology. Lethaia, 13, 183207.

R.B. MacNaughton , J.M. Cole , R.W. Dalrymple , S.J. Braddy , D.E.G. Briggs & T.D. Lukie 2002. First steps on land: arthropod trackways in Cambro-Ordovician eolian sandstone, southeastern Ontario, Canada. Geology, 30, 391394.

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