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Nonlinear electron solutions and their characteristics at infinity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 February 2009

Hilary Booth
Affiliation:
Centre for Bioinformation Science, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia; e-mail: hilary.booth@wintermute.anu.edu.au.
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Abstract

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The Maxwell-Dirac equations model an electron in an electromagnetic field. The two equations are coupled via the Dirac current which acts as a source in the Maxwell equation, resulting in a nonlinear system of partial differential equations (PDE's). Well-behaved solutions, within reasonable Sobolev spaces, have been shown to exist globally as recently as 1997 [12]. Exact solutions have not been found—except in some simple cases.

We have shown analytically in [6, 18] that any spherical solution surrounds a Coulomb field and any cylindrical solution surrounds a central charged wire; and in [3] and [19] that in any stationary case, the surrounding electron field must be equal and opposite to the central (external) field. Here we extend the numerical solutions in [6] to a family of orbits all of which are well-behaved numerical solutions satisfying the analytic results in [6] and [11]. These solutions die off exponentially with increasing distance from the central axis of symmetry. The results in [18] can be extended in the same way. A third case is included, with dependence on z only yielding a related fourth-order ordinary differential equation (ODE) [3].

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Australian Mathematical Society 2002

References

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