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Acoustic and perceptual measurements of prosody production on the profiling elements of prosodic systems in children by children with autism spectrum disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 October 2011

JOSHUA JOHN DIEHL*
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame and Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
RHEA PAUL
Affiliation:
Yale University School of Medicine
*
ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE Joshua Diehl, Department of Psychology, University of Notre Dame, 118 Haggar Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556. E-mail: joshua.diehl@nd.edu

Abstract

Prosody production atypicalities are a feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but behavioral measures of performance have failed to provide detail on the properties of these deficits. We used acoustic measures of prosody to compare children with ASDs to age-matched groups with learning disabilities and typically developing peers. Overall, the group with ASD had longer utterance durations on multiple subtests on a test of prosodic abilities, and both the ASD and learning disabilities groups had higher pitch ranges and pitch variance than the typically developing group on one subtest. Acoustic differences were present even when the prosody was used correctly. These findings represent differences in the fine details of the acoustic output beyond its functional interpretation in both clinical groups.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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Acoustic and perceptual measurements of prosody production on the profiling elements of prosodic systems in children by children with autism spectrum disorders
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