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Effects of perceptual training on second language vowel perception and production

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 November 2015

SOLÈNE INCEOGLU*
Affiliation:
Rochester Institute of Technology
*
ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE Solène Inceoglu, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, Rochester Institute of Technology, 92 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. E-mail: scigsl@rit.edu

Abstract

This study investigates whether audiovisual training leads to greater improvement in perception and production than auditory training. The participants (n = 60) were American English native speakers enrolled in intermediate French courses. They received audiovisual training, audio-only training, or no training, and were tested at pretest and posttest on their perception and production of French nasal vowels. The results suggest that both training groups improved significantly from the pretest to the posttest, but that the differences between the audiovisual and audio-only groups were not statistically significant. However, the production of the audiovisual training group improved significantly more than the production of the audio-only training group did, suggesting that seeing facial gestures leads to greater improvement in pronunciation.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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