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The structure of pattern languages

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 August 2008

Nikos A. Salingaros
Affiliation:
Division of MathematicsUniversity of Texas at San AntonioSan AntonioTX 78249, USA

Abstract

Pattern languages help us tackle the complexity of a variety of systems ranging from computer software, to buildings and cities. Each ‘pattern’ represents a rule governing one working piece of a complex system, and the application of pattern languages can be done systematically. Design that wishes to connect to human beings needs the information contained in a pattern language. This paper describes how to validate existing pattern languages, how to develop them, and how they evolve. The connective geometry of urban interfaces is derived from the architectural patterns of Christopher Alexander.

Type
Theory
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2000

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References

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