Skip to main content
×
×
Home

World War I and Internal Repression: The Case of Major General Nikolaus Cena*

  • Irina Marin
Extract

On 24 August 1914, Lieutenant General Artur von Bolfras warned his peer Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf that the draconian measures directed against domestic suspects were causing a lot of trouble and amounted to throwing the baby out with the bath water by fostering internal animosity. “We should not,” Bolfras insisted, “unnecessarily antagonize the population who have so far shown themselves to be loyal and ready for sacrifice beyond all expectations.” He urged in particular that Conrad should use his influence to put a stop to the excesses of the military command in Temesvár in southern Hungary, where, starting in late July 1914, hundreds of arrests were made following the partial mobilization against Serbia, thus putting into practice Conrad's professed military rationale: “better lock up one hundred people than one too few.” The initial spate of arrests and internments that accompanied the mobilization for war continued well into the autumn of 1914, snowballing into virulent state-driven repression, targeting mostly, but not only, Serbs, a situation which Josef Redlich referred to in his journal as a “race war” and a “systematic policy of extermination.” To Bolfras's letter of notification, Conrad replied that orders had been wired to Temesvár to the effect that abuses should be avoided and the military should work harmoniously with the civilian authorities, but he also signified that “we here can't do anything about individual abuses.”

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      World War I and Internal Repression: The Case of Major General Nikolaus Cena*
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      World War I and Internal Repression: The Case of Major General Nikolaus Cena*
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      World War I and Internal Repression: The Case of Major General Nikolaus Cena*
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
i.marin@ucl.ac.uk
Footnotes
Hide All
*

I would like to thank Professor Pieter Judson for his support and encouragement with the publication of the present article, as well as the AHY anonymous referees for their constructive comments and their valuable suggestions and criticisms. I am also indebted to a number of people for their generous help and support in researching and improving this article: the archivists of the Kriegsarchiv in Vienna and, in particular, Dr. Michael Hochedlinger; Dr. Antonio Schmidt-Brentano; Professor Lothar Höbelt; Mr. Trevor Thomas; Dr. Tamara Scheer; Professor Dennis Deletant; Dr. Tom Lorman; Professor Martyn Rady; Professor Robert Evans; Dr. Zoran Milutinović, Colonel Liviu Groza; and Dr. Daniel Brett. As a version of the present article was given as a paper at the 2011 conference Cultures at War: Austria-Hungary 1914–1918 (St Hilda's College, University of Oxford), I would also like thank the organizers and participants for their feedback and useful comments. Thanks are also due to the Raţiu Family Foundation in the UK, which sponsored my doctoral research.

Footnotes
References
Hide All

1 von Hötzendorf, Conrad, Aus meiner Dienstzeit, 1906–1918, vol. 4 (Vienna, 1921–1925), 135 and 549–50: “ besser hundert Leute einsperren als einen zu wenig.”

2 Das politische Tagebuch Josef Redlichs, Band, I. (1908–1914) (Graz/Cologne, 1953), 280; Mazower, Mark, The Balkans: From the End of Byzantium to the Present Day (London, 2003), 118–19.

3 Conrad von Hötzendorf, Aus meiner Dienstzeit, vol. 4, 551: “für die Übergriffe Einzelner können wir hier nichts.

4 Moll, Martin, “Erster Weltkrieg und Ausnahmezustand, Zivilwaltung, und Armee: Eine Fallstudie zum innerstaatlichen Machtkampf im steirischen Kontext,” in Focus Austria: Vom Vielvölkerreich zum EU-Staat, Festschrift für Alfred Ableitinger zum 65. Geburtstag, ed. Beer, Siegfried, 383407 (Graz, 2003).

5 Scheer, Tamara, “Das k. (u.) k. Kriegsüberwachungsamt und die Zensur Frage. Ein Beitrag zur Sicherung der Heimatfront,” Journal for Intelligence, Propaganda and Security Studies 1, no. 2 (2007): 7082.

6 Moll, “Erster Weltkrieg und Ausnahmezustand, Zivilwaltung, und Armee: Eine Fallstudie zum innerstaatlichen Machtkampf im steirischen Kontext,” 387.

7 Galántai, József, Hungary in the First World War (Budapest, 1989), 77.

8 Rothenberg, Gunther E., The Military Border in Croatia, 1740–1881: A Study of an Imperial Institution (Chicago/London, 1966), 22.

9 The Székelys are a group speaking an archaic dialect of Hungarian whom the Hungarian Crown sent to colonize eastern Transylvania in the medieval period. They acted as border guards and constituted one of the three political nations in the Hungarian Kingdom together with the Hungarian aristocracy and the Saxons.

10 Marchescu, Antoniu, Grănicerii bănăţeni şi Comunitatea de Avere (Contribuţiuni istorice şi juridice) [The Banat Frontiersmen and their Commonwealth (Historical and Juridical Contributions)] (Caransebeş, 1941), 295–96; hereafter Grănicerii bănăţeni.

11 According to V. Ţîrcovnicu, outside the Military Border, trivial was another name for national schools, whereas within the Military Border, it designated a distinct and higher level of education. Ţîrcovnicu, Victor, Contribuţii la istoria învăţământului românesc din Banat (1780–1918) [Contributions to the History of Romanian Education in the Banat (1780-1918)] (Bucharest, 1970), 44, 72.

12 Marchescu, Grănicerii bănăţeni, 270.

13 OeStA, KA, Qualificationsliste, Karton Nummer 338 (Cejnek-Cencur).

14 OeStA, KA, Qualificationslisten, Karton Nr. 338 (Cejnek-Cencur), Nikolaus Cena, National und Dienstbeschreibung für das Jahr 1903, f. 3.

15 Groza, Liviu, Contribuţii la cunoaşterea culturii grănicerilor bănăţeni [Contributions to the Culture of Banat Frontiersmen] (Lugoj, 1993); Irina Marin, “The Formation and Allegiance of the Romanian Military Elite Originating from the Banat Military Border” (PhD diss., University College London, UK, 2009).

16 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5, Referat, der Vorstand der 4. Abt. im k.u.k. Kriegsministerium, Wien am 14. Oktober 1914, f. 19r: “daß er infolge der Mobilisierung die Verfügung über alle Behörden übernehme.”

17 Moll, 389–90.

18 Ibid., 5.

19 Galántai, József, Die Österreichisch-Ungarische Monarchie und der Weltkrieg (Budapest, 1979), 345.

20 OeStA, KA, KM Präs 1914, Aktenzahl 40–19/5, f. 6r.

21 See the letters in the Valeriu Branişte archive concerning the arrests made at the beginning of the war in the Banat: ANCN, Fond Personal Valeriu Branişte, Pachet VI, Nr. act. 213, 10 September 1914 letter from G. Noaghea to Valeriu Branişte; and Pachet VI, Nr. act. 152, 14 November 1914 letter from Nicolae Ionescu to Valeriu Branişte.

22 OeStA, KA, KM Präs 1914, Aktenzahl 40–19/5-3, ff. 38–39.

23 ANCN, Fond Personal Valeriu Branişte, Pachet VI, Nr. act. 152, 14 November 1914 letter from Nicolae Ionescu to Valeriu Branişte, f. 2v.

24 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5-2, Vorstand der 4. Abt. im k.u.k. Kriegsministerium, REFERAT zu Präs. Nr. 13966 von 1914 betreffend den FMLt. d.R. Nikolaus CENA, 19.

25 Das politische Tagebuch Josef Redlichs, I. Band (1908–1914), 66: “für solche Dummheiten habe ich keine Zeit!”

26 OeStA, KA, Kriegsüberwachungsamt (henceforth KÜA) 1914, Aktenzahl 107, 1st item, recto.

27 OeStA, KA, KÜA 1914, Aktenzahl 107, 1st item, verso: “Cena Nikolai EKO-R3, FJO-R, MKV / Tit.-Charge Pens. Fmlt., ständ. Aufenth. Mehadia / Kl. Mann im Zwicker, corpulent, rasch sprechend, verschleiert, deutsch-kroatisch.”

28 OeStA, KA, KÜA 1914, Aktenzahl 107, 2nd item, recto: “FMLt d. R. Cena / Mitteilg des Vertreters des ung. Min. d. Inn. / Am 25/7 nachts wurde FMLt d.R. Nikolaus Cena über Befehl des Stationskmdos in Ujvidék als der Spionage verdächtig, durch das dortige Gendarmerie-Flügel Kdo verhaftet. Am 27 Juli wurde er über ehrenwörtliche Verpflichtung, in seine Gemeinde abzureisen und sich dort aufzuhalten freigelassen.”

29 OeStA, KA, KÜA 1914, Aktenzahl 1597, f. 1r.

30 OeStA, KA, KÜA 1914, Karton 5, Aktenzahl 2922, Folios 1–2.

31 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Aktenzahl 40–19/5, f. 4v.

32 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5, ff. 23–24.

33 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5, ff. 23v–24r: “Während des Gespräches wies er die Behauptung des Generals Musztecza, dass die rumänische Armee besser ist wie die öst.ung mit heftigen Widerspruch zurück, als dieser General Musztecza sagte ‘es können sich die Verhältnisse so gestalten, dass Rumänien mit Österreich-Ungarn in einen Krieg verwickelt wird,’ drauf hat er erwidert ‘Es würde mir sehr leid thun, aber da werdet Ihr uns gegenüber finden.’”

34 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5, Confidential report A cs. és kir. 7. hadtest Vezérkari Osztályának, from Dr. Gozsdu Elek, Royal Chief Prosecutor with the Royal Tribunal in Temesvár, dated 22 August 1914, f. 11r: “1911 évben a Romániában a király tiszteletére rendezett katonai ünnepségre elment s ott magas rangú tisztekkel—köztük egy Mujka nevű román kir. Ezredessel—is megismerkedett.”

35 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5, K. Staatsanwaltschaft in Karánsebes, Beschluss, f. 23r.

36 Tisza's letter to Krobatin, OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5, BUDAPEST, 4 September 1914, f. 3r.

37 Funder, Vom Gestern ins Heute. Aus dem Kaiserreich in die Republik (Vienna, 1952), 542.

38 Ibid., 535–36.

39 József Galántai, Hungary in the First World War, 28–30.

40 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5, f. 3v: “dieses ganze System von Espionage und Geheimpolizistentums.”

41 Führ, Christoph, Das k.u.k. Armeeoberkommando und die Innenpolitik in Österreich (1914–1917) (Graz/Vienna/Cologne, 1968), 28: “Es sind vielfache Klagen eingelaufen, daß in letzterer Zeit neuerlich zahlreiche Verhaftungen von angeblich politisch Verdächtigen oder Unzuverläßlichen in allen Teilen der Monarchie stattgefunden haben, Verhaftungen, welche fast lediglich auf Veranlassung oder über Anforderung militärischer Kommandos und Behörden erfolgen. Ich befehle, daß alle militärischen Stellen strengstens angewiesen werden, derartige Maßnahmen nur auf Grund schwerwiegender Verdachtsmomente zu veranlassen. Ich will nicht, daß durch unberechtigte Verhaftungen auch loyale Elemente in eine staatsschädliche Richtung getrieben werden.”

42 Moll, “Erster Weltkrieg und Ausnahmezustand, Zivilwaltung, und Armee: Eine Fallstudie zum innerstaatlichen Machtkampf im steirischen Kontext,” 395.

43 For a brief presentation of the Ehrenrat, or council of honor, see Sked, Alan, The Survival of the Habsburg Empire: Radezky, the Imperial Army and the Class War 1848 (London/New York, 1979), 27.

44 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1565 (14/8–14/21/20/1), Aktenzahl 14–20/10:

“Ich habe dem Vaterlande und meinem Kaiser durch 41 Jahre treu, ehrlich, in vollen Ehren und verdienstvoll gedient und will mein Leben auch als Ehrenmann, nicht aber mit dem Schatten der Schande befleckt, beschließen.”

45 Nicolai Cena, Protokoll, 29.08.1914, KA, KÜA 1914, Aktenzahl 4066.

46 As Deák points out, “Exzellenz” was the appellation due to two-star generals (FML) and above. Deák, István, Beyond Nationalism: A Social and Political History of the Habsburg Officer Corps (New York/Oxford, 1990), 16.

47 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5, Confidential report A cs. és kir. 7. hadtest Vezérkari Osztályának, from Dr. Gozsdu Elek, Royal Chief Prosecutor with the Royal Tribunal in Temesvár, dated 22 August 1914, f. 12v: “Figyelemmel Csena Miklós magas társadalmi állására és arra, hogy előzetes letartóztatásban van: kérem a véleménynek sürgős közlését.”

48 Allmayer-Beck, “Die Bewaffnete Macht in Staat und Gesellschaft,” in Die Habsburgermonarchie (1848–1918), Band V (Vienna, 1987), 1141, at 107–8.

49 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5-2, Vorstand der 4. Abt. im k.u.k. Kriegsministerium, REFERAT zu Präs. Nr. 13966 von 1914 betreffend den FMLt. d.R. Nikolaus CENA, 19–20.

50 OeStA, KA, KM Präs, 1914, Karton 1583 (40/1–41/3), Aktenzahl 40–19/5-2, 5. Abteilung des k.u.k. Kriegsministeriums, Bemerkung, f. 18v: “Ich fühle mich verpflichtet zu melden, daß ich Seine Exzellenz den Feldmarschalleutnant CENA aus meiner Jugendzeit her kenne, achte und als Vorbild eines Offiziers schätze, der in seiner Heimat bei jedermann—magyarische Chauvinisten ausgenommen—in hohem Ansehen steht. Wird dem Feldmarschalleutnant CENA keine ausreichende Genugtuung zuteil, so wird dies den Eindruck machen, daß der Offizier in allgemeinen—der erste Stand im Reiche—der Willkür der Zivilverwaltung ausgesetzt ist, was bei der loyalen Bevölkerung in der ehemaligen Grenze die bösesten Folgen zeitigen könnte.”

* I would like to thank Professor Pieter Judson for his support and encouragement with the publication of the present article, as well as the AHY anonymous referees for their constructive comments and their valuable suggestions and criticisms. I am also indebted to a number of people for their generous help and support in researching and improving this article: the archivists of the Kriegsarchiv in Vienna and, in particular, Dr. Michael Hochedlinger; Dr. Antonio Schmidt-Brentano; Professor Lothar Höbelt; Mr. Trevor Thomas; Dr. Tamara Scheer; Professor Dennis Deletant; Dr. Tom Lorman; Professor Martyn Rady; Professor Robert Evans; Dr. Zoran Milutinović, Colonel Liviu Groza; and Dr. Daniel Brett. As a version of the present article was given as a paper at the 2011 conference Cultures at War: Austria-Hungary 1914–1918 (St Hilda's College, University of Oxford), I would also like thank the organizers and participants for their feedback and useful comments. Thanks are also due to the Raţiu Family Foundation in the UK, which sponsored my doctoral research.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Austrian History Yearbook
  • ISSN: 0067-2378
  • EISSN: 1558-5255
  • URL: /core/journals/austrian-history-yearbook
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed