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The Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment of Hallucinations and Delusions: A Preliminary Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2009

David Fowler
Affiliation:
MRC Social Psychiatry Unit, Institute of PsychiatryDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Leeds
Stephen Morley
Affiliation:
MRC Social Psychiatry Unit, Institute of PsychiatryDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Leeds

Abstract

Five patients suffering from chronic and distressing psychotic symptoms were treated with a cognitive-behavioural approach designed to modify their beliefs that their auditory hallucinations were real, and to enhance their ability to control psychotic experiences. Four of the patients reported an increase in their ability to control hallucinations, but only one of these also reported a decreased frequency of hallucinating and a reduced belief in the reality of hallucinations. The discussion focusses on the implications for future interventions in this area.

Type
Clinical Section
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 1989

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