Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-pgkvd Total loading time: 0.23 Render date: 2022-08-13T06:15:15.989Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Manualized Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment Package for Adolescent Self-Harm

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 March 2011

Lucy M. W. Taylor*
Affiliation:
Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) Service, Maudsley Hospital, UK
Anna Oldershaw
Affiliation:
Kings College London, Institute of Psychiatry, UK
Clair Richards
Affiliation:
NHS Brighton & Hove Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, UK
Kate Davidson
Affiliation:
University of Glasgow, Gartnavel Royal Hospital, UK
Ulrike Schmidt
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, UK
Mima Simic
Affiliation:
The Maudsley Hospital, London, UK
*
Reprint requests to Lucy M. W. Taylor, Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) Service, Michael Rutter Centre, Maudsley Hospital, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AZ, UK. E-mail: lucy.taylor@slam.nhs.uk

Abstract

Background: Manualized cognitive-behavioural therapy (MCBT) approaches to treating adolescent anxiety and depression have been shown to be effective in recent years, as have MCBT for adult self-harm (SH). Aims: This paper describes the rationale for, development and pilot evaluation of the efficacy of a novel manualized CBT package for adolescent self-harm (SH). It also addresses the acceptability of this treatment package to therapists and patients. Method: Twenty-five adolescents (aged 12–18 years) presenting to a Community Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) in Greater London with SH behaviour began the “Cutting Down” programme and 16 (64%) completed the treatment. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, at the end of treatment and at 3 month follow up. Results: Significant reductions in self-harm behaviour, depression symptoms and trait anxiety were reported. There was no change in state anxiety or in levels of parental expressed emotion as perceived by the adolescent. Conclusion: These pilot findings provide preliminary support for the efficacy and acceptability of this time-limited CBT package for adolescents who self-harm.

Type
Brief Clinical Reports
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Audit Commission (1999). Children in Mind: child and adolescent mental health services. London: HMSO.Google Scholar
Cole, J. and Kazarian, S. (1988). The Level of Expressed Emotion Scale: A new measure of expressed emotion. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 44, 392397.3.0.CO;2-3>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Costello, E. J. and Angold, A. (1988). Scales to assess child and adolescent depression: checklists, screens, and nets. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 27, 726737.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Davidson, K., Norrie, J., Tyrer, P., Gumley, A., Tata, P., Murray, H. and Palmer, S. (2006). The effectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy for borderline personality disorder: results from the borderline personality disorder study of cognitive therapy (BOSCOT Trial). Journal of Personality Disorders, 20, 450465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans, E., Hawton, K., Rodham, K. and Deeks, J. (2005). The prevalence of suicide phenomena in adolescents: a systematic review of population based studies. Suicide & Life Threatening Behaviour, 35, 239–50.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hawton, K., Rodham, K., Evans, E. and Weatherall, R. (2002). Deliberate self-harm in adolescents: self report survey in schools in England. British Medical Journal, 325, 12071211.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schmidt, U. and Davidson, K. (2003). When Life is Too Painful: finding options after self-harm. London: Psychological Press.Google Scholar
Spielberger, C. D., Edwards, C. D., Lushene, R., Montuori, J. and Platzek, D. (1973). State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (manual). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.Google Scholar
Tarrier, N., Taylor, K. and Gooding, P. (2008). Cognitive-behavioral interventions to reduce suicide behavior: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Behavioral Modification, 32, 77108.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Supplementary material: File

Taylor Supplementary Material

Taylor Extended Report

Download Taylor Supplementary Material(File)
File 294 KB
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.
46
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Manualized Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment Package for Adolescent Self-Harm
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Manualized Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment Package for Adolescent Self-Harm
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Manualized Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment Package for Adolescent Self-Harm
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *