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Group-Based Worry Intervention for Persecutory Delusions: an Initial Feasibility Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 June 2018

Louise Isham*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Warneford Lane, Oxford OX3 7JX and Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, 63 Yeoman House, Penge, London SE20 7TS
Heidemarie Grafahrend
Affiliation:
Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, Bridgeways Day Hospital, Turpington Lane, Bromley BR2 8JA
Alecia Nickless
Affiliation:
Primary Care Clinical Trials Unit, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6GG
Katherine Pugh
Affiliation:
Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Research & Development Department, Sussex Education Centre, Nevill Avenue, Hove, East Sussex BN3 7HY
Steve Pleasants
Affiliation:
Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust ResearchNet, 63 Croydon Road, London SE20 7TS
Nicola Smedley
Affiliation:
Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, Bromley Intensive Case Management Psychosis Team East, 1–6 Carlton Parade, Orpington, Kent BR6 0JB
Daniel Freeman
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7JX
Alison Mulligan
Affiliation:
Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, Bromley Intensive Case Management Psychosis Team West, 63 Yeoman House, Penge, London SE20 7TS
*
*Correspondence to Louise Isham. E-mail: louise.isham@psych.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

Background: A one-to-one cognitive behavioural therapy intervention targeting worry significantly reduces both worry and persecutory delusions (Freeman et al., 2015). Aim: To adapt this intervention for group delivery and conduct a feasibility trial within routine clinical practice. Method: Thirteen participants were randomized to a weekly 8-session worry intervention group (n = 7) or wait-list control (n = 6). Results: All but one participant completed measures at all time points. Participants attended an average of six therapy sessions. Conclusions: Recruitment, retention and therapy uptake were feasible. Observed treatment effects were in the expected direction, but may be diluted compared with one-to-one interventions.

Type
Brief Clinical Report
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2018 

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References

Barrowclough, C., Haddock, G., Lobban, F., Jones, S., Siddle, R. O. N., Roberts, C. and Gregg, L. (2006). Group cognitive-behavioural therapy for schizophrenia. British Journal of Psychiatry, 189, 527532.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Behar, E., Alcaine, O., Zuellig, A. R. and Borkovec, T. D. (2003). Screening for generalized anxiety disorder using the Penn State Worry Questionnaire: a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 34, 2543. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0005-7916(03)00004-1CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Freeman, D. (2016). Persecutory delusions: a cognitive perspective on understanding and treatment. The Lancet Psychiatry, 3, 685692. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(16)00066-3CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Freeman, D., Dunn, G., Startup, H., Pugh, K., Cordwell, J., Mander, H. et al. (2015). Effects of cognitive behaviour therapy for worry on persecutory delusions in patients with psychosis (WIT): a parallel, single-blind, randomised controlled trial with a mediation analysis. The Lancet Psychiatry, 2, 305313. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00039-5CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Newton, E., Larkin, M., Melhuish, R. and Wykes, T. (2007). More than just a place to talk: young people's experiences of group psychological therapy as an early intervention for auditory hallucinations. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 80, 127149. https://doi.org/10.1348/147608306X110148CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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