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Motivational Interviewing with Problem Drinkers: II. The Drinker's Check-up as a Preventive Intervention

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2009

William R. Miller
Affiliation:
University of New Mexico
R. Gayle Sovereign
Affiliation:
University of New Mexico
Barbara Krege
Affiliation:
University of New Mexico

Abstract

Miller's (1983) system of ‘motivational interviewing’ is elaborated by providing a theoretical context for understanding its impact, with a summary of research on motivational interventions. An extension of this approach, the Drinker's Check-up (DCU), is described as a potential intervention for health screening, treatment selection and matching, cleint self-assessment, and research. Initial data from a sample of 42 problem drinkers receiving the DCU suggest that this intervention may increase help-seeking and modestly suppress alcohol consumption. This approach is interpreted within the broader context of research on minimal interventions for problem drinkers.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 1988

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