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Reliability and Validity of the Short Schema Mode Inventory (SMI)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 May 2010

Jill Lobbestael*
Affiliation:
Maastricht University, the Netherlands
Michiel van Vreeswijk
Affiliation:
Psychomedical Centre G-kracht, Delft, the Netherlands
Philip Spinhoven
Affiliation:
Leiden University, the Netherlands
Erik Schouten
Affiliation:
Maastricht University, the Netherlands
Arnoud Arntz
Affiliation:
Maastricht University, the Netherlands
*
Reprint requests to Jill Lobbestael, Maastricht University, Department of Clinical Psychological Science, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, the Netherlands. E-mail: jill.lobbestael@maastrichtuniversity.nl

Abstract

Background: This study presents a new questionnaire to assess schema modes: the Schema Mode Inventory (SMI). Method: First, the construction of the short SMI (118 items) was described. Second, the psychometric properties of this short SMI were assessed. More specifically, its factor structure, internal reliability, inter-correlations between the subscales, test-retest reliability and monotonically increase of the modes were tested. This was done in a sample of N = 863 non-patients, Axis I and Axis II patients. Results: Results indicated a 14-factor structure of the short SMI, acceptable internal consistencies of the 14 subscales (Cronbach α's from .79 to .96), adequate test-retest reliability and moderate construct validity. Certain modes were predicted by a combination of the severity of Axis I and II disorders, while other modes were mainly predicted by Axis II pathology. Conclusions: The psychometric results indicate that the short SMI is a valuable measure that can be of use for mode assessment in SFT.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2010

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