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Current status and distribution of birds of prey in the Canary Islands

  • CÉSAR-JAVIER PALACIOS (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0959270904000255
  • Published online: 01 August 2004
Abstract

I analyse recent trends in the status and distribution of breeding birds of prey in the Canary Islands (Spain). Populations of Barbary Falcon Falco peregrinus pelegrinoides, Eleonora's Falcon Falco eleonorae, Sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus granti, Buzzard Buteo buteo insularum and Osprey Pandion haliaetus recovered throughout the 1990s. Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus majorensis continues to be seriously threatened, with a total population of only around 130 birds. There is a lack of information on status of nocturnal birds of prey, especially of the Canary subspecies of Barn Owl Tyto alba gracilirostris, whose numbers seem to have decreased. Genetic studies should be carried out to clarify the taxonomic status of the birds of prey of the Canary Islands.

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Bird Conservation International
  • ISSN: 0959-2709
  • EISSN: 1474-0001
  • URL: /core/journals/bird-conservation-international
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