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    Webber, Alyson F. Heath, Julie A. and Fischer, Richard A. 2013. Human disturbance and stage-specific habitat requirements influence snowy plover site occupancy during the breeding season. Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 3, Issue. 4, p. 853.


    Maguire, Grainne Rimmer, James and Weston, Michael 2013. Stakeholder Perceptions of Threatened Species and Their Management on Urban Beaches. Animals, Vol. 3, Issue. 4, p. 1002.


    Ehmke, Glenn Maguire, Grainne S. Bird, Tomas Ierodiaconou, Daniel and Weston, Michael A. 2016. An obligate beach bird selects sub-, inter- and supra-tidal habitat elements. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, Vol. 181, p. 266.


    Maguire, G. S. Rimmer, J. M. and Weston, M. A. 2015. Stakeholder knowledge of threatened coastal species; the case of beach-goers and the Hooded Plover Thinornis rubricollis. Journal of Coastal Conservation, Vol. 19, Issue. 1, p. 73.


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Provision of artificial shelter on beaches is associated with improved shorebird fledging success

  • GRAINNE S. MAGUIRE (a1), ANDREW K. DUIVENVOORDEN (a2), MICHAEL A. WESTON (a2) and ROBYN ADAMS (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0959270910000420
  • Published online: 11 August 2010
Abstract
Summary

Artificial chick shelters might improve productivity of beach-nesting birds threatened by anthropogenic disturbance. We investigated the efficacy of three different chick shelter designs against four criteria: accessibility to chicks over time, thermal insulation, conspicuousness to beach-goers, and practicality (cost and ease of transport). One design (‘A-frame’) was selected because it offered the greatest thermal insulation, was the least conspicuous, most cost effective, and performed equally well in terms of accessibility. We deployed these artificial shelters on Hooded Plover Thinornis rubricollis territories where broods were present (n = 11), and compared the behaviour and survival rate of chicks to that at control sites (n = 10). We were unable to discern any difference in the behaviour of broods when artificial shelters were available. However, the survival rate of chicks to fledging was 71.8% higher where an artificial shelter was provided (n = 21 broods). This was validated by analysing data from a larger sample of broods monitored as part of an active volunteer-based management programme; shelters conferred a 42.8% increase in survival to fledging (n = 81 broods). Thus, artificial shelters have the potential to increase survival rates of threatened shorebird chicks, though the mechanisms through which survival is increased require further investigation.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence: email: g.maguire@birdsaustralia.com.au
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Bird Conservation International
  • ISSN: 0959-2709
  • EISSN: 1474-0001
  • URL: /core/journals/bird-conservation-international
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