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The importance of greenspace for mental health

  • Jo Barton (a1) and Mike Rogerson (a2)
Abstract

There is an urgent global need for accessible and cost-effective pro-mental health infrastructure. Public green spaces were officially designated in the 19th century, informed by a belief that they might provide health benefits. We outline modern research evidence that greenspace can play a pivotal role in population-level mental health.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
References
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Alcock, I., White, M. P., Wheeler, B. W., et al (2014) Longitudinal effects on mental health of moving to greener and less green urban areas. Environmental Science and Technology, 48, 12471255.
Barton, J., Bragg, R., Wood, C., et al (eds) (2016) Green Exercise: Linking Nature, Health and Well-Being. Routledge.
Brymer, E. & Davids, K. (2014) Experiential learning as a constraint-led process: an ecological dynamics perspective. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 14, 103117.
Craig, J. M., Logan, A. C. & Prescott, S. L. (2016) Natural environments, nature relatedness and the ecological theater: connecting satellites and sequencing to shinrin-yoku. Journal of Physiological Anthropology, 35, 1.
Kellert, S. R. (2016) Nature in buildings and health design. In Green Exercise: Linking Nature, Health and Well-Being (eds Barton, J., Bragg, R., Wood, C., et al), pp. 1725. Routledge.
Maas, J., Verheij, R. A., De Vries, S., et al (2009) Morbidity is related to a green living environment. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 63, 967973.
Mitchell, R. (2013) Is physical activity in natural environments better for mental health than physical activity in other environments? Social Science and Medicine, 91, 130134.
Shanahan, D. F., Fuller, R. A., Bush, R., et al (2015) The health benefits of urban nature: how much do we need? Bioscience, 65, 476485.
van den Berg, A. E., Hartig, T. & Staats, H. (2007) Preference for nature in urbanized societies: stress, restoration, and the pursuit of sustainability. Journal of Social Issues, 63, 7996.
van den Berg, A. E., Maas, J., Verheij, R. A., et al (2010) Green space as a buffer between stressful life events and health. Social Science and Medicine, 70, 12031210.
Wells, N. M. & Evans, G. W. (2003) Nearby nature a buffer of life stress among rural children. Environment and Behavior, 35, 311330.
White, M. P., Bell, S., Elliott, L. R., et al (2016) The health benefits of blue exercise in the UK. In Green Exercise: Linking Nature, Health and Well-Being (eds Barton, J., Bragg, R., Wood, C., et al), pp. 6978. Routledge.
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BJPsych International
  • ISSN: 2056-4740
  • EISSN: 2058-6264
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-international
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The importance of greenspace for mental health

  • Jo Barton (a1) and Mike Rogerson (a2)
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